EMGo Launches a $6,000 Motorcycle Compatible With Electric Car Chargers

DaveM

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A three-old company named EMGo Technology LLC in Ukraine is turning heads with the launch of their new $6,000 electric motorcycle – and it’s the first motorcycle to support an electric car charger.

Let’s talk about it.

A side view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


“We Electricate Everything”​


EMGo Technology is the brainchild of Motorcycle RND Center and the GEON Group – two businesses specializing in virtually anything the green energy industry can ask of a brand.

A view of the battery and motor area on the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


From “design, development, and production of household and industrial energy storage devices for smart homes, solar systems, wind turbines, mobile power substations” to “international research projects in the field of renewable energy [and] close technological interaction with associates around the world, exchange of experience, knowledge, and specialists,” EMGo Technology takes this mountain of knowledge and pours it into their creations.

A view from above of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


The beasties themselves also come complete with ‘smart batteries’ – high-performance batteries with onboard three-phase inverters and cooling systems.

Naturally, those systems are also integrated the latest and greatest into their new motorcycle, christened the ScrAmper.

A side view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


The ScrAmper is advertised as “a powerful and technologically advanced machine capable of competing on equal terms with the leaders of the ‘middle +’ segment of the electric motorcycle market.”

A back view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


That’s a hefty claim, especially since fossil fuel machines are known for handling a harder push than their electric counterparts…but what’s particularly unique is the ScrAmper’s ability to use the full max capacity of a battery without damaging the performance of the system – that, and the fact that you can pull all the juice you need from a generic electric car charger.

A back view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


One of the company’s technical managers states in an article from The Pack that “we were one of the first to install support for car chargers on an electric motorcycle. A powerful onboard charger is integrated into the motorcycle itself, which allows you to charge the battery via a car charging system (CCS Type 2) or a regular 220V network (charging cable included)”

A view of the back wheel on the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


What’s being charged? Glad you asked.

According to the report, the bike features “10 kW batteries [that] run for 35 minutes without degradation and damage to the elements at a long peak of 24 kW”. Those same batteries are capable of rapid charge, with 45 minutes taking the system from 0% to 80% and a further 1.5 hours charging the beastie to a full 100%.

A view of the battery present for the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


EMGo Technology LLC also boasts that the ScrAmper will eventually be upgraded to a ‘turbo’ 24Kw edition, capable of handling speeds up to 170 km/h (105.6 mph), with the current models being able to toss out a neat 130 km/h (80.78 mph) at maximum speed, 160 km (99.4 miles) in a city setting, and up to 110 km (68.35 miles) in mileage clocked if you really decide to give ‘er.

A side view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


All told, EMGo is far from done tampering with their ScrAmper. As is the case with any machine in the world of technology, changing specs call for constant updates – and the ScrAmper’s near future is no exception. Expect the next model (ScrAmper PRO) to get a transition from a gearbox to a direct transmission (central motor), with an increase in power up to 26 kW, speeds to 170 km/h, and a range of up to 70 km (43.4 miles).

Here’s a further list of the specs if you want to get down and nerdy about it.

Charge time

  • 50% — 30 min.
  • 80% — 60 min.
  • 100% — 100 min.

Speed

  • 1st gear- 45 km/h
  • 2nd gear – 45-80 km/h
  • 3rd gear – 80-104 km/h
  • 4th gear- 104-130 km/h

Range

  • 45 km/h ~ 200 km
  • 65 km/h ~ 160-185 km
  • 85 km/h ~ 150-160 km
  • 125 km/h ~ 90-110 km

Battery

  • Li NMC, 92,4 V 104 Ah

Frame

  • Steel tubular

Front suspension

  • Inverted telescopic fork

Rear suspension

  • Steel pendulum, mono-shock absorber

WheelBase

  • 1400 mm

Maximum mileage

  • Up to 160 km (at a speed of 95 km/h)

Transmission

  • BLDC is an engine with a peak power of up to 16 kW at 7200 RPM. 4-speed gearbox, which works similarly to gasoline

Brakes

  • Front, disk, 270 mm
  • 2-piston caliper rear, disc, 220 mm, single-piston caliper (he electromagnetic braking of the motor is an adjustable parameter)

Wheels and Tires

  • Reinforced rims, spokes, and hubs.
  • Formula 17/17 with tires 50/50, for passability on roads and easy off-road
  • Tires 110/90 – 17 / 130/80 – 17

A back view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


With the mass production launch date just a few months away in December 2021, I personally can’t wait to take a gander at the first units expected to hit the market in 2022. Odds are that the specs will put the ScrAmper around the likes of the SONDORS MetaCycle, as well as the NIU RQI – a Chinese brand of electric bike that’s been picking up in popularity lately.

A side view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


Stay tuned for updates; we always have our ear to the ground and will update on anything that comes our way.

In the meantime, be sure to check out other electric machines floating around in the Powersports industry – and as always, stay safe on the twisties.

The post EMGo Launches a $6,000 Motorcycle Compatible With Electric Car Chargers appeared first on webBikeWorld.

Source...
 

shanered6

Time for adventure
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shane llywarch
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An electric bike that actually looks good ! .... and at a reasonable price .
 

NWGABikerGuy

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A three-old company named EMGo Technology LLC in Ukraine is turning heads with the launch of their new $6,000 electric motorcycle – and it’s the first motorcycle to support an electric car charger.

Let’s talk about it.

A side view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


“We Electricate Everything”​


EMGo Technology is the brainchild of Motorcycle RND Center and the GEON Group – two businesses specializing in virtually anything the green energy industry can ask of a brand.

A view of the battery and motor area on the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


From “design, development, and production of household and industrial energy storage devices for smart homes, solar systems, wind turbines, mobile power substations” to “international research projects in the field of renewable energy [and] close technological interaction with associates around the world, exchange of experience, knowledge, and specialists,” EMGo Technology takes this mountain of knowledge and pours it into their creations.

A view from above of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


The beasties themselves also come complete with ‘smart batteries’ – high-performance batteries with onboard three-phase inverters and cooling systems.

Naturally, those systems are also integrated the latest and greatest into their new motorcycle, christened the ScrAmper.

A side view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


The ScrAmper is advertised as “a powerful and technologically advanced machine capable of competing on equal terms with the leaders of the ‘middle +’ segment of the electric motorcycle market.”

A back view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


That’s a hefty claim, especially since fossil fuel machines are known for handling a harder push than their electric counterparts…but what’s particularly unique is the ScrAmper’s ability to use the full max capacity of a battery without damaging the performance of the system – that, and the fact that you can pull all the juice you need from a generic electric car charger.

A back view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


One of the company’s technical managers states in an article from The Pack that “we were one of the first to install support for car chargers on an electric motorcycle. A powerful onboard charger is integrated into the motorcycle itself, which allows you to charge the battery via a car charging system (CCS Type 2) or a regular 220V network (charging cable included)”

A view of the back wheel on the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


What’s being charged? Glad you asked.

According to the report, the bike features “10 kW batteries [that] run for 35 minutes without degradation and damage to the elements at a long peak of 24 kW”. Those same batteries are capable of rapid charge, with 45 minutes taking the system from 0% to 80% and a further 1.5 hours charging the beastie to a full 100%.

A view of the battery present for the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


EMGo Technology LLC also boasts that the ScrAmper will eventually be upgraded to a ‘turbo’ 24Kw edition, capable of handling speeds up to 170 km/h (105.6 mph), with the current models being able to toss out a neat 130 km/h (80.78 mph) at maximum speed, 160 km (99.4 miles) in a city setting, and up to 110 km (68.35 miles) in mileage clocked if you really decide to give ‘er.

A side view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


All told, EMGo is far from done tampering with their ScrAmper. As is the case with any machine in the world of technology, changing specs call for constant updates – and the ScrAmper’s near future is no exception. Expect the next model (ScrAmper PRO) to get a transition from a gearbox to a direct transmission (central motor), with an increase in power up to 26 kW, speeds to 170 km/h, and a range of up to 70 km (43.4 miles).

Here’s a further list of the specs if you want to get down and nerdy about it.

Charge time

  • 50% — 30 min.
  • 80% — 60 min.
  • 100% — 100 min.

Speed

  • 1st gear- 45 km/h
  • 2nd gear – 45-80 km/h
  • 3rd gear – 80-104 km/h
  • 4th gear- 104-130 km/h

Range

  • 45 km/h ~ 200 km
  • 65 km/h ~ 160-185 km
  • 85 km/h ~ 150-160 km
  • 125 km/h ~ 90-110 km

Battery

  • Li NMC, 92,4 V 104 Ah

Frame

  • Steel tubular

Front suspension

  • Inverted telescopic fork

Rear suspension

  • Steel pendulum, mono-shock absorber

WheelBase

  • 1400 mm

Maximum mileage

  • Up to 160 km (at a speed of 95 km/h)

Transmission

  • BLDC is an engine with a peak power of up to 16 kW at 7200 RPM. 4-speed gearbox, which works similarly to gasoline

Brakes

  • Front, disk, 270 mm
  • 2-piston caliper rear, disc, 220 mm, single-piston caliper (he electromagnetic braking of the motor is an adjustable parameter)

Wheels and Tires

  • Reinforced rims, spokes, and hubs.
  • Formula 17/17 with tires 50/50, for passability on roads and easy off-road
  • Tires 110/90 – 17 / 130/80 – 17

A back view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


With the mass production launch date just a few months away in December 2021, I personally can’t wait to take a gander at the first units expected to hit the market in 2022. Odds are that the specs will put the ScrAmper around the likes of the SONDORS MetaCycle, as well as the NIU RQI – a Chinese brand of electric bike that’s been picking up in popularity lately.

A side view of the ScrAmper - an electric motorcycle from Ukranian brand EMGo, capable of using an electric car charger


Stay tuned for updates; we always have our ear to the ground and will update on anything that comes our way.

In the meantime, be sure to check out other electric machines floating around in the Powersports industry – and as always, stay safe on the twisties.

The post EMGo Launches a $6,000 Motorcycle Compatible With Electric Car Chargers appeared first on webBikeWorld.

Source...
Interesting, and likely the inevitable wave of the future, but... until they increase the range of these bikes to beyond 100 miles, I think they are going to remain novelties and toys. Even in city commuting, the temperature and driving style variations are such that the range is a serious limiting factor. Add to that the lack of charging infrastructure in all but the largest cities (mostly in California), and I think we have a long way to go before "Electrification" becomes a practical reality. Is it just me, or do the frame welds on the first close-up look sloppy and not very robust?
 

sikatri

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I like that a reasonable price is being explored. As mentioned technical issues still need to be addressed, range and so on. Although, it might still make a city commuter with the current spec.
 

DaveM

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I would still love to have a go on one of these bikes it must really be fun.
 

Vector

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NWGABikerGuy

Member
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I would still love to have a go on one of these bikes it must really be fun.
Me too! We have owned a Chevy Bolt, and a Volt, and the silent acceleration is really a blast! It is especially fun next to revving muscle cars at stoplights because they are so shocked to be left behind that they have to make-up for it by passing you at about twice the speed limit! We traded both cars. Even on the Bolt the range and charging infrastructure were very limiting. The Volt hybrid really hit a sweet spot because we could do all our around town driving with zero gas consumption and charge it at night during off-peak hours for mere pennies. It was a good-looking, nice handling, practical car, so of course Chevy canned it and stopped making it in 2019. Ours was a 2017 that we traded as soon as we learned it would soon be an orphan and did OK. We just could not see our way to shelling out the dough for a Tesla, especially after the tax breaks went away. Having been "electrified" for a couple of years, my personal opinion is that unless you live on the West coast or in a big city that has streamlined the permitting process for charging stations, all this Going Green hoopla is not going to happen anywhere near as soon as we are led to believe. If you doubt this, count the gas stations along the way on your next 100 mile + drive, and then look-up the number and location of charging stations along the same route. Also, keep in mind that you are quite likely to be kept waiting for your turn at a charger while someone else is plugged in. How long do you wait for a pump at the gas station? I am not opposed to electrification (although I do think it's benefits are overstated and its drawbacks are largely overlooked), but I think it will be a lot like self-driving cars - lots of
PR and not much practicality.
 

sikatri

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Me too! We have owned a Chevy Bolt, and a Volt, and the silent acceleration is really a blast! It is especially fun next to revving muscle cars at stoplights because they are so shocked to be left behind that they have to make-up for it by passing you at about twice the speed limit! We traded both cars. Even on the Bolt the range and charging infrastructure were very limiting. The Volt hybrid really hit a sweet spot because we could do all our around town driving with zero gas consumption and charge it at night during off-peak hours for mere pennies. It was a good-looking, nice handling, practical car, so of course Chevy canned it and stopped making it in 2019. Ours was a 2017 that we traded as soon as we learned it would soon be an orphan and did OK. We just could not see our way to shelling out the dough for a Tesla, especially after the tax breaks went away. Having been "electrified" for a couple of years, my personal opinion is that unless you live on the West coast or in a big city that has streamlined the permitting process for charging stations, all this Going Green hoopla is not going to happen anywhere near as soon as we are led to believe. If you doubt this, count the gas stations along the way on your next 100 mile + drive, and then look-up the number and location of charging stations along the same route. Also, keep in mind that you are quite likely to be kept waiting for your turn at a charger while someone else is plugged in. How long do you wait for a pump at the gas station? I am not opposed to electrification (although I do think it's benefits are overstated and its drawbacks are largely overlooked), but I think it will be a lot like self-driving cars - lots of
PR and not much practicality.
You hit the drawbacks and advantages. If you charge overnight at home, it works as a work around town commuter. If you have to travel a lot, not practical. Some day yes. I’m also not fond of the battery hazard issue which has been shown with teslas once the battery gets on fire. It’ll get worked out eventually, but I think many of us won’t see that day.
 

ThomasG

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Me too! We have owned a Chevy Bolt, and a Volt, and the silent acceleration is really a blast! It is especially fun next to revving muscle cars at stoplights because they are so shocked to be left behind that they have to make-up for it by passing you at about twice the speed limit! We traded both cars. Even on the Bolt the range and charging infrastructure were very limiting. The Volt hybrid really hit a sweet spot because we could do all our around town driving with zero gas consumption and charge it at night during off-peak hours for mere pennies. It was a good-looking, nice handling, practical car, so of course Chevy canned it and stopped making it in 2019. Ours was a 2017 that we traded as soon as we learned it would soon be an orphan and did OK. We just could not see our way to shelling out the dough for a Tesla, especially after the tax breaks went away. Having been "electrified" for a couple of years, my personal opinion is that unless you live on the West coast or in a big city that has streamlined the permitting process for charging stations, all this Going Green hoopla is not going to happen anywhere near as soon as we are led to believe. If you doubt this, count the gas stations along the way on your next 100 mile + drive, and then look-up the number and location of charging stations along the same route. Also, keep in mind that you are quite likely to be kept waiting for your turn at a charger while someone else is plugged in. How long do you wait for a pump at the gas station? I am not opposed to electrification (although I do think it's benefits are overstated and its drawbacks are largely overlooked), but I think it will be a lot like self-driving cars - lots of
PR and not much practicality.
Completly agree :y45:
 
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