Flying Trumpet: Triumph Scrambler Enduro Racer!

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Flying Trumpet: Triumph Scrambler Enduro Racer!

Triumph Scrambler Enduro
Photo: Brandi Scarborough (@b.scarborough88)

“Rosie,” MotoADVR’s Beloved Triumph XC Racer…

In recent years, there’s been a fast-growing segment in off-road racing: Hooligan and Adventure Bike Enduro, in which riders tackle desert, woods, and cross-country racing on street-legal multi-cylinder machines instead of purpose-built enduro bikes.

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

The good folks at Heavy Enduro, who provide ADV training in the US Midwest, might say it best:

“The bikes we choose to ride are not typically associated with Enduro. They are built for long distance travel, with large displacement engines, monster gas tanks, seats for two, and a couple of panniers. Most often found on dirt roads, loaded with luggage, and headed for adventure. Let’s be honest, that’s what they’re designed for, and that’s what they’re good at. But here at HE, we just think they’re big dirtbikes.”

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

Out West, we’ve seen Hooligan Enduro Sportsters and Ducati Scramblers tackling events like the Mint 400 and Mexican 1000, while Pol Tarrés finished the infamous Red Bull Romaniacs Hard Enduro this year on a Yamaha Ténéré 700. On the East Coast, Kentucky CrossCountry Racing (KXCR) has introduced an Adventure class, as have many other regional racing series.

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

Today, we’re thrilled to feature the daily rider and race bike of Drew Faulkner, the mechanical engineer, blogger, podcaster, rally organizer, and woods racer behind Motoadventurer.com — aka @MotoADVR. The bike is a 2013 Triumph Scrambler (air-cooled) nicknamed “Rosie,” which has accompanied him through more than 80,000 miles of tarmac, gravel, dirt, and mud!

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

Drew says he caught moto fever after returning home from Iraq shortly after the 2008 recession hit, which necessitated some penny-pinching to keep the bikes on the road — but paid off in the long run:

“The bike(s) lived on the porch for a long time, which both literally and figuratively led to me becoming a shade tree mechanic — which paid off when I could afford new parts for my beloved Scrammy. The drawn-out progression of the Triumph also enhanced the overall experience — over 81,000 miles, the bike has evolved as my skills evolved. I’ve been through cruisers, dual-sports, and dirt bikes, but Rosie still rules the roost.”

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

Over the years, Drew has slowly transformed his Scrambler into a race-ready machine. Highlights include a +30mm fork travel kit from Free Spirit Parts, 375mm Öhlins rear shocks, a custom 3D-printed rear rimlock, Spiegler brake lines, dirt bike fenders, custom fabbed light / fender brackets, and much more. Drew says Rosie is surprisingly good in the slippery stuff:

“The air-cooled Triumph mill is an absolute tractor. The Scrambler is really stall resistant and will churn through the mud as long as you have the skills to stay in the saddle.”

Photo: Bill DeVore (@finemedic211)

Though the rear suspension travel (~5 inches) and front wheel size are limiting performance factors, the fun factor is off the charts:

“The 19” front can also be a bit twitchy, but I still giggle like an idiot in my helmet blasting around the Holler on this uncorked trumpet.”

Below, we talk to Drew for the full story on the build, along with photos from Bill DeVore, Amanda Mohr, and Brandi Scarborough. Enjoy!

Heavy Enduro: Triumph Scrambler XC Racer​

Triumph Scrambler Enduro
Photo: Amanda Mohr (@amandascottmohr)

• Please tell us a bit about yourself, your history with motorcycles, and your workshop.​


I’m a mechanical engineer from 9-5, but moonlight as a blogger, podcaster, photographer, adventure motorcycle rally organizer, and amateur woods racer. After returning home from Iraq, I legit caught moto fever after watching that gorgeous Ducati run around the streets in Tron: Legacy. Getting into motorcycles right after the ’08 recession, I was forced to pinch pennies to keep bikes roadworthy.



The bike(s) lived on the porch for a long time, which both literally and figuratively led to me becoming a shade tree mechanic — which paid off when I could afford new parts for my beloved Scrammy. The drawn-out progression of the Triumph also enhanced the overall experience — over 81,000 miles, the bike has evolved as my skills evolved. I’ve been through cruisers, dual-sports, and dirt bikes, but Rosie still rules the roost.

• What’s the make, model, and year of the donor bike?​


2013 Triumph Scrambler with over 81,000 miles, still my daily rider and ADV machine.

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

• For what class of racing was the bike built?​


Kentucky CrossCountry Racing (KXCR) Adventure Class.



• What custom work/upgrades have been done?​

  • Custom tank graphics and race numbers
  • Fabricated rear number plate
  • Volkswagen Beetle Tapered Exhaust Mufflers
  • Free Spirit Parts +30mm fork travel kit
  • Ohlins Fork Pre-load adjusters
  • Ohlins TR628 Street STX36 Twin Shocks (375mm +10mm)
  • Rox 50mm bar Risers
  • Pro-taper 7/8″ CR-High bars
  • Oxford Heaterz heated grips
  • Double-take Mirrors
  • Tusk wrap-around hand guards
  • fabricated skid plate extension
  • Rear brake relocation
  • Motion Pro “Brake Snake”
  • Spiegler Brake lines
  • Triumph headlight grill & skid plate
  • MSR Folding Shift Lever
  • Fabricated front fender bracket
  • 2015 KTM 350 XCf=F-W front fender
  • 2004 Suzuki RM125 rear fender
  • Fabricated rear indicator & license plate bracket
  • Tusk indicators & brake light
  • Hand modified front sprocket cover
  • Custom designed and 3D printed rear rimlock
  • Dart flyscreen

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

• Does the bike have a nickname?​


”Rosie.”

Triumph Scrambler Enduro
Photo: Bill DeVore (@finemedic211)

• Any idea of horsepower, weight, and/or performance numbers?​


60 hp, 54 lb-ft of torque according to Triumph. Stripped down to race, she’s 477 pounds with 2 gallons of gas.

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

• Can you tell us what it’s like to ride/race this bike?​


The air-cooled Triumph mill is an absolute tractor. The Scrambler is really stall resistant and will churn through the mud as long as you have the skills to stay in the saddle. On the flipside, considering the shock options available, I’m limited to about 5” of rear suspension travel — things get out of shape really fast if you hit the whoops or jumps too fast. The 19” front can also be a bit twitchy, but I still giggle like an idiot in my helmet blasting around the Holler on this uncorked trumpet.

Triumph Scrambler Enduro

• Anybody you’d like to thank?​


KXCR for making this race opportunity possible. A & J Cycles for keeping my springy bits sorted. Triumph of Harrisonburg and Joe’s Cycle for keeping the beast roadworthy. Heavy Enduro for promoting the ADV race community. Bill, Amanda, and Brandi for making me look like I know what I’m doing in the camera lens; and a huge shout out to all the fans cheering on the big bike racers.

Follow the Builder / Racer​


Web: Moto Adventurer
Instagram: @motoadvr

Photographers:
@b.scarborough88 (Brandi Scarborough)
@amandascottmohr (Amanda Mohr)
@finemedic211 (Bill DeVore)

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