Forking Mystery Oil

3 TriumphT100R

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Has anyone here ever used marvel mystery oil in the forks? I am working on a project and thought if nothing else after some miles, it will at the very least clean the insides up quite nicely. Any experience or thoughts out there?
 

grandpaul

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I just dismantle, thoroughly wash with 50/50 hot water & Simple Green, repair as required, re-assemble, and fill with proper amount of 10W30 Castrol.
 

Josheezpapa

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Lucas fork oil is probably the best solution, imo.
Fork oil really needs to meet several important criteria... my last two race bikes (Maicos) seemed to like it after I discovered it. Bel Ray before that
 

3 TriumphT100R

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I just thought I would see what others thought. My intent was not to clean it as much as see if anyone had ever tried it. It has so many uses and is amazing stuff. I do prefer a relatively stiff fork but not unreasonably so. I am too old to ride real hard anyway ! Ha
 

Josheezpapa

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I think its a creative idea.. I like people that think outside the normal box... im not the type of guy thats super comfortable with reasons like
"Because thats how we have always done it"
I'd rather try to understand why we've always done it that way.
This is a good example of that, and I THINK I know the answer, but haven't ever given it a thought so I can't say for sure

It's interesting
 

grandpaul

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I think its a creative idea.. I like people that think outside the normal box... im not the type of guy thats super comfortable with reasons like "Because thats how we have always done it"
I'd rather try to understand why we've always done it that way.
This is a good example of that, and I THINK I know the answer, but haven't ever given it a thought so I can't say for sure
As a follow up to "that's how I've always done it", I've NEVER had an oil related engine failure with well over 100 major rebuild/overhaul/refurb/restoration/custom builds. Also never had my any of my stuff apart later and found wear issues that shouldn't be there based on mileage. NOT EVER (25+ years)

So, I keep doing it "by the book".
 

grandpaul

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CONVERSELY, as a follow-up to my follow-up, I moderate here, on TriumphTalk.Com, on several now quiet forums related to British & Vintage bikes, and on a couple of fecebook groups. I am also a member on several other fecebook groups.

What I have seen posted on a regular basis, is complaints from people who have used synthetic lubes in their classic bikes. Mainly leakage issues that were never there before switching over.

"Just for the record", again over 20 years with the online forums, so a bit better than "anecdotal"...

So, I keep doing it "by the book".
 

sikatri

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CONVERSELY, as a follow-up to my follow-up, I moderate here, on TriumphTalk.Com, on several now quiet forums related to British & Vintage bikes, and on a couple of fecebook groups. I am also a member on several other fecebook groups.

What I have seen posted on a regular basis, is complaints from people who have used synthetic lubes in their classic bikes. Mainly leakage issues that were never there before switching over.

"Just for the record", again over 20 years with the online forums, so a bit better than "anecdotal"...

So, I keep doing it "by the book".
By the book is why I buy service manuals. It’s how I taught myself to repair cars decades ago. Doing the same with my motorcycle and asking here.
 

Josheezpapa

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The engineers clearly know more than I do, but today's engineers know more than engineers 50 years ago.
Even my current books reccomend fork oil... forks are hydraulic units... with modern advancements in lubricants and hydraulic oils, there very likely could be better options than 10wt non detergent oil.... as far as synthetics, there's a ton of information and real world there.... I never had a seal fail in some seriously abused maico and Marzocchi mx forks..
50 year old tried and true experience will still work today.
But engineering has moved forward a lot... maybe there's a better way? Maybe... sometimes its worth looking into.

When we ran cr500s, everyone swore by vertex cast pistons, and lots of guys cracked pistons.
Why aren't you using wiseco forged?
Because they came with cast.. everyone runs cast. Etc... clearance this, measure that....
Guys would get 4 weekends out of pistons, we'd get 2 seasons ....

Sometimes status quo is that way for a reason..
Sometimes not
I just think its interesting to question status quo sometimes... it doesn't mean there IS a better way

Synthetics not sealing was the subject of a long discussion I was involved in at Harley Davidson University in 2003... its been well researched and sometimes its a thing. But more often its easy to blame is all

I don't use leaded fuel in my bikes anymore either

Busy night, helping a buddy with a 410 sprinter... wish us luck... have fun.
 

Josheezpapa

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Can't be a racer and not look at things objectively
Signing out. rock on
 

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Can't be a racer and not look at things objectively
Signing out. rock on
Trying to find innovative approaches is good. For me going down the path of accepted is a basic. To go to innovation, it contains risk. That doesn’t mean someone shouldn’t try it. It takes a long time to come up with definitive data, for me I have limited years ahead. Try it if you are inclined.
 

grandpaul

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The engineers clearly know more than I do, but today's engineers know more than engineers 50 years ago.
Even my current books reccomend fork oil... forks are hydraulic units... with modern advancements in lubricants and hydraulic oils, there very likely could be better options than 10wt non detergent oil.... as far as synthetics, there's a ton of information and real world there.... I never had a seal fail in some seriously abused maico and Marzocchi mx forks..
50 year old tried and true experience will still work today.
But engineering has moved forward a lot... maybe there's a better way? Maybe... sometimes its worth looking into.

When we ran cr500s, everyone swore by vertex cast pistons, and lots of guys cracked pistons.
Why aren't you using wiseco forged?
Because they came with cast.. everyone runs cast. Etc... clearance this, measure that....
Guys would get 4 weekends out of pistons, we'd get 2 seasons ....

Sometimes status quo is that way for a reason..
Sometimes not
I just think its interesting to question status quo sometimes... it doesn't mean there IS a better way

Synthetics not sealing was the subject of a long discussion I was involved in at Harley Davidson University in 2003... its been well researched and sometimes its a thing. But more often its easy to blame is all

I don't use leaded fuel in my bikes anymore either

Busy night, helping a buddy with a 410 sprinter... wish us luck... have fun.
Your discussion points are very valid.

However, as I mentioned (IN MY CASE, nobody else's) I DIDN'T have broken this, or leaking that, or worn out other stuff (when using "by the book lubes, long term).

SO, there was no "winning argument" to change anything from factory recommendations.

I'll add, the modern Castrol 4-stroke "GO" stuff is excellent. Still manufacturer's recommendation (such as is available any more), but is thoroughly modern.
 

speedrattle

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i just use 20/50 motor oil in all my forks. im a peasant.works good enough for me.
 

grandpaul

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i just use 20/50 motor oil in all my forks. im a peasant.works good enough for me.
That's too heavy for me! I use 10/30 (by the book)
 

speedrattle

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ive never used anything else

but then i use a sheet of plywood as a mattress to sleep on

ill give some 10W30 a go. i have some kicking around for the little japanese bikes
 

3 TriumphT100R

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As I have said before, I just was curious if anyone had had ever tried MMO. My 79 Bonneville says to use ATF which for my taste was not any better than nothing or maybe water. I think I used either the same engine oil or SAE 30. In any event, I am happy to be a part of such a lively forum. This was quite some time ago as for way too many years I was doing a dance of one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel. I am hoping that all is over with now. I think I will flush the forks, put in some MMO and see how it feels. If the forks need taken apart that is ok as I think I will be doing a couple of engines over the winter anyway. I really do appreciate all of the feed back. This seems to be a great group !
 

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fork oil is like spark plugs. there is a factory recommendation, and its where you should think about starting. but then you experiment, and go with what works. i live three miles from the nearest pavement, and the short travel forks on my stuff work well with a heavy oil. but i'm always changing things.

see what works for you.
 

brooke

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I don’t even change my own fork oil any more , have no idea what my mechanic uses but thank God I have him . The tigers original forks seals didn’t last long and the new set he put in didn’t survive a bad pot hole on a good Nova Scotia road . Next set he reduced the volume of fork oil by 10 per cent or so from Triumph specs and they are still working great . What does Triumph know about those Japanese forks anyway .
I tried synthetic differential oil in my CX 650 e and a Mustang . They both leaked like a sieve , but today I am a big fan of synthetics , modern 2 strokes in snowmobiles wouldn’t be possible without it .
Racers , I believe , tend to be the main culprits when it comes to experimenting over their heads . When air suspension first became the craze , I put air valves from the plumbing supply store in the Can Am 250 GP ‘s forks . They worked great and the Can Am needed the help . I was talking to one of the factory guys on the phone one day , something I rarely did , and I mentioned I was using air . He asked what pressure I was running , I said 40 pounds . 40 pounds he gasped , we only run 20 , what springs are using ?? Springs ? said I , I’m not running Any Springs and I seem to have gained some a bit of travel as well . You’ve gained travel alright , he explained , the 40 pounds is totally compressing the top out spring .
Next week the springs we’re back in .
 

speedrattle

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Racers , I believe , tend to be the main culprits when it comes to experimenting over their heads

yes. but sometimes they discover things that make them go faster, and thats what racing is all about.
 

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yes. but sometimes they discover things that make them go faster, and thats what racing is all about.
True. It’s important to also recognize the positives and negatives. Racing teams can quickly rebuild a machine, the typical motorcycle owner cannot. A gain advantage may not be worth it to most.
 
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