Might be time for my next bike.

lhedrick

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Larry
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While there are things I like about modern bikes, there is even more things I don’t like. Traction control,,,,,, no thanks but it would seem there is no way around it.

In the adventure group we have a choice of about 10 bikes when you consider 700 up to 1200 CC motors. No question, they all run great. I could live with any one of them but, I don’t think I want to work on any of them and I would like to stay between 400 and 450 pounds (200 KG). My choice to replace my old 650 will come down to a few items. Which bike is the simplest, the most pervasive, the most parts available and most of all is it easy to service. I 6 foot 4 225 pounds so I can ride any of the bikes no matter how tall they are.

I helped a friend check the valve clearance on a Honda Africa twin at 35,000 miles. What a joke, I think we had to dissemble half the bike. I’m surprised Honda didn’t design it so we had to remove both wheels too. Are they all like this?

As for the Tiger 800, it looks like a good candidate. What I hope to learn from all of you here is, is it reasonable easy to work on it.

How much work is it to change the spark plugs?

How many hours will it take to install new valve shims?
 

DaveM

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With an Adventure bike you really need to be able to do roadside repairs yourself and they have now made this impossible. Out of all the bikes I would look at would also be the Tiger but once again you need a dealer to do everything on them these days.
 

CarlS

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The Tiger 800 is fairly easy to work on. My one big gripe is that you have to remove the tanks to change the air filter. I do not do the valve the checks I do not have a suitable work space for that. Once the engine is cold, it takes about an hour to check the valves and add shims if necessary. I was looking at the 1200 Scrambler yesterday. It looks easier to work on than the Tiger. Had the 1200 Scrambler been around when I bought my Tiger 800XC, I would be riding the Scrambler.

Don't get me wrong, the Tiger is the best all around bike I have owned in 60 years of riding. And I love the triple. But I also love parallel twins and I love the retro looks of the Scrambler. I have 39,600 trouble free miles on my Tiger.
 

lhedrick

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Had the 1200 Scrambler been around when I bought my Tiger 800XC, I would be riding the Scrambler.
I know it's been many years but back in the 70s I had a Bonneville. I seem to remember the pistons were 2 up 2 down. Not much different than a single cylinder system. I do remember it was anything but smooth. Are the new scrambler engines similar?
 

CarlS

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They are counterbalanced and smooth.. I still have a 1968 650 cc and what you say is true. I had a 2003 Bonneville; it was nothing like my 68. The modern parallel twins have a completely redesigned modern engine. When Triumph was developing the new Bonneville, released in 2001, several folks testing them complained that the engines were too smooth. It didn't fell like a motorcycle. So Triumph backed off a little on the counter balancing. The results are what we have today. The Bonneville family has been a big seller. Try a modern parallel twin; you will be amazed.
 

Rocky

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As Carl said, the modern twins are very smooth.
The Scrambler has a 270 degree crankshaft. Do a Google search for an explanation better than I can do here.
 

lhedrick

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So I looked into what is involved to do what should be a minor maintenance item, the air filter. I found a youtube video of someone doing the change. Take the seats off, take off side panels, take off the tank, undo a bunch of connectors. Looked like a job which will take a few hours. I have to say, if the new tiger has not addressed this, I think it would be a deal breaker for me. Flat out bad design from my perspective. I expect replacing valve shims to be a job but not an air filter.
 

CarlS

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I change my own air filters and even though it is a PITA; i is not bad. When i am due to change the air filter, every 12,000 miles, i just run the fuel tank low to reduce the weight of the tank. Next I remove the seats and side covers, disconnect the fuel line and the overflow, undo two bolts and lift the tank off. Change the filter and put it back together again. Other than ABS, my 2012 doesn't have all of the electronics that the newer Tigers have. Maybe there is more to disconnect on the newer Tigers.

For the benefits I have in riding the 800XC - the torque, the smoothness of the engine. the dependabiity, the comfortable ride, changing the air filter is a minor inconveience which I only have to onceor twice a year at most.
 
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