My First Bobber Oil Change

Snakesfield

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I highly recommend that you do this with two people. Because, it can become quite a mess without two people. Anyway, I did my yearly oil change with my Amsoil 20-40 metric oil along with the filter. I got it done rather nicely also, to save money when I take it into the shop for it's yearly service. They can reset my lite and do all the things that are supposed to be done on a yearly bases, that way I'm good to go for another year. Even though the light hasn't gone off yet. I still like to stay on top of my oil changes along with ratador flushes too. Enjoy the great weather and the rides, my friends.
 

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I'm a little surprised that you had some difficulty changing the oil. It's really quite easy and shouldn't be messy at all or take two people to do it.
I don't know anything about your history with working on bikes, so maybe, since is the first oil change, you're not quite onto the technique. I also don't want to appear to be talking down to you.
I'm no mechanical genius, but I've been changing oil on my bikes for the past 27 years and have never made a mess.
I'm pretty sure the procedure is the same as my Bonneville - if not exactly the same.
What part of the procedure gave you the most trouble or caused a mess? Maybe I/we can give you some tips.
 
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I agree with Rocky. I have been changing the oil in my bikes and trucks for many years. I do not see where an oil change would take two people. Now over the years, I have made a few messes; but those were because of my own stupidity! Not becuae the job was complex or complicated.

I, too, use Amsoil 20W 40 Metric.
 

Snakesfield

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The problem is there is no center stand. As far as the change goes that's easy. But where the extra person comes in very handy. He is able to stand the bike up while you use your filter wrench in taking off the filter and draining it without spilling it. Then you have to have a very low drain pan also. Then after you make that change. You take the 8 mm allen wrench and open the drain plug. Again very easy. But that extra person comes in very handy when you drain the bike, Because there's no center stand and I think the bobber sets really low also. To have someone hold the bike really helps out a lot. So, that you can get a drain pan under there. Then, it also helps to have someone hold the bike up straight, while filling it to the correct level, with oil too. Then while the other guy is still holding the bike straight. Then I can poor the oil in and watch too make sure that it goes between the two lines. Start it up run it a few minutes, then check the lines again then top it off, so that it's in between the lines. Then your ready to go. Rocky, I think that your bike sets higher than mine does. But, yes the oil change is very easy to do easy to do. But since there's no center stand and it also set's low. That's one of the reasons that it handle so good. But I maybe wrong also. But I never had to find that low of a drain pan with any other bike that I've owned except for, a Harley with a rigged frame. It took a really low drain pan.
 

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No center stand - that explains everything!
I was pretty sure this wasn't your first oil change, but why you had a problem was the big mystery BGRIN
 

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I would hate not having a center stand! No wonder you want two people.
 

Snakesfield

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No center stand - that explains everything!
I was pretty sure this wasn't your first oil change, but why you had a problem was the big mystery BGRIN
Not being able to find a drain pan that's low enough to get under the Bobber was the main problem. I had to use a very low cut cat litter box for a drain pan.The other problem is the drain plug is right next to the kick-stand, right by the oil filter and the Bobber sets low to the ground to begin with. It wasn't that difficult to change at all. All I'm saying, is that for the Bobber. it's a whole lot easier to change the oil with two people, than one. For the reasons that I've mentioned.
 

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Fully understood why it was harder than it should have been.
I have a Baxley sport chock that grips the front wheel and holds the bike steady and upright.
Something like this could be your second person and comes in handy when you want to work on the bike in an upright position.

51h6UDFihtL__SL1000_.jpg
 
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Snakesfield

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Fully understood why it was harder than it should have been.
I have a Baxley sport chock that grips the front wheel and holds the bike steady and upright.
Something like this could be your second person and comes in handy when you want to work on the bike in an upright position.

View attachment 44877
I like this a lot. Where did you get it and how much did it cost you? This is exactly what I need. Great job, Rocky.
Thank you so much. I'll buy me one of these bad boys on Monday and oil changing, along with changing out the the radiator fluid will also will be so much easier. You my friend, are a lifesaver and I can't thank you enough for your help. Awesome tool.{ Rocky is the man }.
 

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BGRIN too much praise :y50:
The Baxley is probably the top of the line and is pricey, but they are exceptionally well made and very substantial.
I've had mine for years and the current price is probably around $300.00. There are cheaper ones that should work just as well.
I bought mine from Baxley, but you may be able to shop around on the 'net and find the best price.
Google Baxley Sport Chock and that should give you plenty of leads.
 
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Snakesfield

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Thank you very much and you do deserve a praise too, for the help. So, don't be shy. When you do a good a good thing, you get rewarded by karma. I fill that you deserve a praise for helping a fellow rider. I'm not trying to kiss your rear end. I just think that you deserve a praise for helping a fellow rider out. I didn't know anything about that tool, until now. So you deserve a big praise for that and a very big thank you also. That's what this site is about and that's why I like it.
 

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You're a fun guy Snakesfield and it's a pleasure for me to help if I can.
Thanks for the kind words. Nice folks here who also like to help.
 

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I was curious about the sport chock so did a bit of research.
The picture of the chock above is not the model I have. Sorry, that was my mistake - and about the price.
That one is the adjustable chock and is the most expensive one for bikes with bigger tires than our Triumphs.

Baxley is in Alabama and from their web site the sport chock is $199.00 - and made in the U.S.
This is what it looks like.
You roll the bike in and it's self-clamping. Tug back on the handlebars and it rolls back out.
The hinged ramp/clamp flips up behind the tire and helps to hold it in place, but is still easy to back out.
Sorry for the confusion.

44885
 

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That might also lift the bike up enough to give you the room underneath. if not, clamp it to a 2X4 or two. that will definitely lift it high enough for you.
 

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I've thought about that, but I'm afraid that I might damage something. Because that oil plug and filter are right there, by the kick stand. But I'll check around down there and see if it can be done. It's a good idea, especially with a floor jack and two 2/4s or 2/6s. You could make some small wooden platform that you could put on and take off a floor jack, would be kinda cool.
 

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I also have paddock stands to either lift the front forks or the swingarm.
I don't have this exact one, but it's the same type for the rear. There are several on the market and this is just used as an example. They all look pretty much the same.
The tabs fit under the swingarm and lifts it up a few inches. Very sturdy and safe.
This might be safer than making some type of wooden platform, but whatever works for you.

It's pretty risky trying to use it with the bike on the sidestand because the bike might come up and go past vertical and fall over.
I run the bike into the chock which holds the bike vertical and secure, and then lift it up.
Maybe I'm just chicken because this video gets it done BGRIN

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zba0TzztzQw


Can a centerstand be fitted to the bobber? That would solve a lot of problems.

44913en_constands-rear-wheel-lift.jpg

Update:

Having said all this, I took some time to do some research on the bobber and learned that it doesn't have a traditional swingarm.
In order to use a paddock stand you have to fit bobbins to the frame and the paddock stand needs fittings to match the bobbins.
Anyway, food for thought and something to consider.
 
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Rocky, I, too, am chicken. I put my bikes in the chock, too. However, with my Tiger 800 XC, the center stand suffices because the ground clearance is already substantial.
 

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I've thought about that, but I'm afraid that I might damage something. Because that oil plug and filter are right there, by the kick stand. But I'll check around down there and see if it can be done. It's a good idea, especially with a floor jack and two 2/4s or 2/6s. You could make some small wooden platform that you could put on and take off a floor jack, would be kinda cool.
Sorry did not mean to use wood under bike but under the wheel chock Rocky posted with the picture. Only your front wheel will lift a bit higher.
 

Snakesfield

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I think both will work out really good. As long as they can lift the bike up high enough and keep it straight while you can get an oil pan under, the bike? That's really all I care about. That and when I'm filling it back up with oil. To make sure that I get the oil between the lines. I like both though. What's that other one going for? The Bobbers also sets lower, than the T120s and T110s do. Plus, the t120s and t110s have that nice center stand too. Which really helps out a lot. Really though, I just offer one of my neighbors a few nice beers to help out, by holding up the bike straight. While I do the change. It goes by quickly with two people. Plus, my neighbor gets to suck down a few good beers also and he loves to tell some good old war stories, I like to listen too. So, it a win, win situation for all.
 

Snakesfield

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I also have paddock stands to either lift the front forks or the swingarm.
I don't have this exact one, but it's the same type for the rear. There are several on the market and this is just used as an example. They all look pretty much the same.
The tabs fit under the swingarm and lifts it up a few inches. Very sturdy and safe.
This might be safer than making some type of wooden platform, but whatever works for you.

It's pretty risky trying to use it with the bike on the sidestand because the bike might come up and go past vertical and fall over.
I run the bike into the chock which holds the bike vertical and secure, and then lift it up.
Maybe I'm just chicken because this video gets it done BGRIN

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zba0TzztzQw


Can a centerstand be fitted to the bobber? That would solve a lot of problems.

View attachment 44913View attachment 44914

Update:

Having said all this, I took some time to do some research on the bobber and learned that it doesn't have a traditional swingarm.
In order to use a paddock stand you have to fit bobbins to the frame and the paddock stand needs fittings to match the bobbins.
Anyway, food for thought and something to consider.
Thank you, for the really great info.
 
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