Shotgun Approach For Advice!

DRod

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hey, don't forget a few other important things to consider....
- spare bike key for emergencies (zip tied to the bike, somewhere hidden or underneath the seat)
- always a good idea to invest in a good pair of photochromic sunglasses. (especially if you don't plan on wearing full face all of the time)
- riding boots should be waterproof. (most are not, so please check)
- it's always good to have an ID bracelet or dog chain (www.roadid.com ) add emergency contact info, blood type, allergies, etc.
- first aid kit
- tire pressure gauge
- kickstand pads (for those gravel, sandy, etc parking situations)
- hardcopy map (just in case you don't have cell phone coverage)


have fun.. and don't forget to post pics and details later.
 

Qship

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With regards to your choice of windscreen, I would go with the taller choices if possible and cut it down as required. I find for myself that being able to look over the windscreen is best and I don't get any helmet buffeting.(I ride with an open face). Very seldom do bugs hit me as they get pushed up and over with the wind. My Thunderbird came with the tall screen and I looked through it. Drove me nuts, especially when the sun would hit it at certain angles and it was hard to see. Also it created a "bubble" behind the screen that trapped hot air behind it and was intolerable on hot days. Any reputable glass shop should be able to cut it down for you.
 

SarahP

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hey, don't forget a few other important things to consider....
- spare bike key for emergencies (zip tied to the bike, somewhere hidden or underneath the seat)
- always a good idea to invest in a good pair of photochromic sunglasses. (especially if you don't plan on wearing full face all of the time)
- riding boots should be waterproof. (most are not, so please check)
- it's always good to have an ID bracelet or dog chain (www.roadid.com ) add emergency contact info, blood type, allergies, etc.
- first aid kit
- tire pressure gauge
- kickstand pads (for those gravel, sandy, etc parking situations)
- hardcopy map (just in case you don't have cell phone coverage)


have fun.. and don't forget to post pics and details later.
**********************************************************************
DRod, these are great suggestions, thank you! I have most of what you suggested but totally forgot about the first aid kit. Doh!
 

SarahP

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With regards to your choice of windscreen, I would go with the taller choices if possible and cut it down as required. I find for myself that being able to look over the windscreen is best and I don't get any helmet buffeting.(I ride with an open face). Very seldom do bugs hit me as they get pushed up and over with the wind. My Thunderbird came with the tall screen and I looked through it. Drove me nuts, especially when the sun would hit it at certain angles and it was hard to see. Also it created a "bubble" behind the screen that trapped hot air behind it and was intolerable on hot days. Any reputable glass shop should be able to cut it down for you.
**************************************************************
Qship, I never even knew it was possible to cut down a windscreen. How do you know how far down to cut it? I'm pretty sure I don't want to ride with a tall screen that I look through. The Honda VTX has a huge windscreen, and I'm uncomfortable trying to look through it. Maybe I just need a lot more miles to get used to it. But it drives me nuts right now. Thanks for the advice!
 

Rocky

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It's always best to look over a screen rather than through it.
Cutting down a screen is fairly common, but it takes some care and effort and only a bit at a time until you get the effect you're looking for.
Once you have chosen a screen and had some experience with it, we can get into cutting it down later - or not - hopefully not.
Generally, you won't need to cut it, but much depends on how tall you are in the saddle and how air flows over the screen. You can only learn that by riding.

I ride alone a lot so I have a www.roadid.com bracelet with contact/medical info as well as the same info on a card in my wallet.
 
Last edited:

SarahP

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It's always best to look over a screen rather than through it.
Cutting down a screen is fairly common, but it takes some care and effort and only a bit at a time until you get the effect you're looking for.
Once you have chosen a screen and had some experience with it, we can get into cutting it down later - or not - hopefully not.
Generally, you won't need to cut it, but much depends on how tall you are in the saddle and how air flows over the screen. You can only learn that by riding.

I ride alone a lot so I have a www.roadid.com bracelet with contact/medical info as well as the same info on a card in my wallet.
*******************************************************************************************************
Rocky,

As usual, Google is our friend...I found a plethora of good videos on cutting down screens. This gives me the confidence to buy a screen without worrying excessively about the height of it, knowing it can be tweaked in the future if necessary.

The suggestions about roadid.com led me to their website and then to their app. I already have a dog tag setup: 6 dog tags listing my allergy, meds, medical history, insurance, doctor, and contact info. I know, it's a book, right?! I had the dog tags made from a seller on eBay, I think, or Amazon. They were very reasonable. I also wear a Fox whistle, a firestarter, and a rave light on the chain.

I downloaded the roadid app, granted it access to all my Contacts, Photos, bank accounts, passport Trusted Traveler info, and DNA genome sequence. In return, it wouldn't let me edit my Info section on the eCrumb Lock Screen page, so I deleted it.

Hoping to order a windshield today!
 

DRod

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gosh you move fast. you're already googling things like cutting down a wind screen. I admire that. good for you. now don't get it too large or you'll end up looking like this...

large windscreen.jpg


And, knowing me and my "expertise" in precision cutting, if I were to cut one down I would probably end up with something like this..

cracked.jpg
 

Rocky

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BGRIN funny stuff DR TUP

Yes, Google and YouTube certainly are your friends these days.
My snowblower blew a bearing last winter and it would cost more that it's worth (parts and labor) for a shop to fix it.
I had no repair manual so I went to Google and found many videos on how to repair it.
I'm a quick study, and since I'm pretty handy with wrenches, I tore it apart and repaired it with a $45.00 bearing.
It's working like a charm again.
 

SarahP

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BGRIN funny stuff DR TUP

Yes, Google and YouTube certainly are your friends these days.
My snowblower blew a bearing last winter and it would cost more that it's worth (parts and labor) for a shop to fix it.
I had no repair manual so I went to Google and found many videos on how to repair it.
I'm a quick study, and since I'm pretty handy with wrenches, I tore it apart and repaired it with a $45.00 bearing.
It's working like a charm again.
***********************************************************************************
Rocky, good on ya for fixing that blower! You saved hundreds of bucks. That justifies buying some cool moto stuff, right?

As much as I don't *really* want to be turning wrenches, there's a certain satisfaction you get when you know that you've done a repair well. You know 'zactly what the guts of the system look like, how you fixed it, what tools you used --- so I'll probably be dragged into it, kicking and screaming, at least for oil changes and chain cleanings. Not sure I'm into rebuilding fuel assemblies or electronics boards!
 

SarahP

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Drod,

That is hilarious, both pics! Loved them!
 

Rocky

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***********************************************************************************
Rocky, good on ya for fixing that blower! You saved hundreds of bucks. That justifies buying some cool moto stuff, right?

As much as I don't *really* want to be turning wrenches, there's a certain satisfaction you get when you know that you've done a repair well. You know 'zactly what the guts of the system look like, how you fixed it, what tools you used --- so I'll probably be dragged into it, kicking and screaming, at least for oil changes and chain cleanings. Not sure I'm into rebuilding fuel assemblies or electronics boards!

Yes, learning what was inside the snowblower and how everything works was a side benefit to the repair.

You have a very modern and reliable motorcycle so I don't think you will be doing much more than routine stuff, oil, filter, chain.
I recommend buying a box of industrial grade/mechanics nitrile (latex type) disposable gloves for working around grease and used oil.
 

keystiger

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AND ALWAYS remember We are all HERE 'cause we are not ALL THERE!:party1:ROFLMAO:y26:
 

Rocky

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Mad On Triumphs

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AND ALWAYS remember We are all HERE 'cause we are not ALL THERE!:party1:ROFLMAO:y26:

Well keys definitely isn't all there or here for that matter, which begs the question "Where is he then "
Find him boy, find Key's.
hector2_3116190b.jpg
 

Iflybikes

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Folks,

(WARNING: huge Wall of Text to follow. My apologies.)

(Being new, I didn't know if my post should go in this Forum or under Riding Gear & Equipment -- so Mods, if you relocate it, I'll understand!)

I have a ton of questions for you experienced Triumph riders, and Bonnie owners in particular. If you want to chime in on any or all of these questions, I would sure appreciate it.

Let me preface this by saying that I'm trying to keep this from being a take-take-take scenario. But I'm on the far side of 55, I had two very serious health scares last year (everything is fine now!), and I really do feel the pressure to get this show on the road! I've waited 44 years to learn to ride, and I am totally nuts about it. So rather than my trying to reinvent the wheel (which takes time that I may not have) through trial and error, I am hoping you all might share your experiences and suggestions about gear, mods, etc., if you feel OK doing that.

My goal this year is to get comfortable enough on my just-purchased 2013 Bonnie to do a New Mexico road trip in September 2016. I would rent a Bonnie in Albuquerque and then do about a week's ride in the state. (Or maybe ship my bike out there?)

I'm planning on doing at least 5 trips locally, trying to increase my seat endurance time, and to make sure that I'm somewhat proficient on the bike. I'm a new rider, with 5 months and 2000 miles under my belt.

While it's still cool/winter weather (I live in Northern Virginia), I plan on hitting the parking lot and doing slow speed MSF-type drills. I did/do that on my little Honda bike, doing U-turns, weaves, stops, etc., and that practice has served me well.

Now, on to the gear questions:

(1) Windshield - I think this is pretty important for longer road trips. I don't have one on the Honda, and I feel as though I've been beaten up when I finish 100 miles. Is the short Triumph flyscreen fine or should I look for an after-market off-brand?

(2) Rear luggage rack and sissy bar - Renntec? I have the Triumph wax cotton saddlebags but definitely need more storage for my blow dryer, curling iron, panini maker, and Keurig on those long road trips. :) Seriously, I'd like to have a rear storage and maybe a sissy bar to stack some stuff up against. (I'm not going to be riding 2-up at all.) Any suggestions?

(2A) Tank bag -- Amazon has a very affordable one: what do you think about it?

(3) Security - Disc lock? Alarmed cover? Beat-up cover with duct tape on it? Cujo? I'm weak on this area. How do you keep your bike from being stolen when you overnight at a hotel?

(4) What do *you* think is really important for a touring ride? How many miles do you average each day, generally? I'm planning 5 'training' rides before teh New Mexico trip. The rides will be mostly in Virginia, ranging from Colonial Parkway near Willamsburg (about 240 miles round trip), 3 or 4 rides up into the Blue Ridge/Skyline Drive, and a bigger trip of 760 miles round trip (a visit to my sister in Charlotte NC). Of course, I ride locally almost every day when I'm home.

The longest ride I've done so far was 200 miles round trip on the Honda CRF230M, that dual-sports 234cc bike. No windshield, seat like a wood plank, top speed *maybe* 65 mph with the throttle full open. I felt as though I'd done 12 rounds in a boxing ring when I got home that evening! I loved it, but some creature comforts would have helped the ride.

OK, I told you this would be a Wall of Text. Again, any advice would be greatly appreciated. I have very thick skin, so if you see a glaring lapse in logic, let me know, please!

TIA!!
Take a look at Motorcycle Windshields for BMW, Aprilia, Buell, Ducati, Honda, Kawasaki, Moto Guzzi, Suzuki, Triumph and Yamaha I know I'm and old fuddy but I hate being beat up by the winds at the speeds I like to travel at (70-75mph, 120kph ) and absolutely hate being caught in the rain without protection. This one fit my 2021 Bonne perfectly, comes up to just below my eye level by about an inch(5'11"), is VERY solid in construction, comes in 18, 20 and 22" height(mines the 22") and best of all, shipped with mounting hardware it was under $290.00.
 

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