The Classic Motorcycle

DaveM

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The late Anthony F Wilding

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Fabulous Zenith V-twin transporting a Wimbledon tennis champion and steered by an Olympic gold medal winner.

Image: Mortons Archive

Published in the May 20, 1915 issue of The Motor Cycle, this picture was shown with the caption: “The late Captain A F Wilding, in the sidecar of Lieut-Commander G W Hillyard’s 10.8hp Zenith machine. Both were keen motorcyclists, although, of course, they were known best as lawn tennis players, especially Wilding. The latter was killed a few days ago.”

Alongside the picture came an obituary, explaining: “Undoubtedly Captain Wilding, R N D, who was killed in action recently in France, was best known in the world of sport as a lawn tennis champion, but the part he took in the motor cycle pastime was by no means inconsiderable.

“From the earliest days he was an enthusiastic motor cyclist, and the first important competition in which he took part was the Land’s End to John O’Groats trial in 1908, in which he gained a gold medal. His next feat was to attempt to get from London to Constantinople on his Bat, to which make he was very faithful. He succeeded after many trials and troubles in getting as far as Nish, in Serbia.

“Wilding was a splendid specimen of humanity, a fine sportsmen, and a genial companion. Owing to the fact that he had travelled the world he was cosmopolitan in his ideas and had little of the British insularity about him.”

His obituary goes to mention that Wilding was a fine cricketer and also born in New Zealand, the latter fact puts him in a class of one, as the only Kiwi to win the Wimbledon tennis championships, which Wilding did in 1910. He defended his title at the next three Wimbledons, too, on his way to becoming a true world sporting icon.

Tony Wilding was born on October 31, 1883, in Christchurch, to wealthy English parents, who’d emigrated to New Zealand. Anthony’s father Frederick was a tennis doubles champion and also represented New Zealand at cricket; Anthony was a first class cricketer too, but tennis was Tony’s real game. He (partnered by Norman Brookes, from Melbourne) was responsible for Australasia winning the Davis Cup (then the International Lawn Tennis Challenge) in 1907, 1908 and 1909. Wilding was ranked number one in the world in 1911, won a bronze medal at the 1912 Olympics and his record of 114 career outdoor records, shared with Rod Laver, still stands, as does Wilding’s 23 titles in a single season, in 1906. The duo of Brookes and Wilding won the 1914 David Cup; it was Wilding’s last sporting conquest. He was killed at Neuve-Chappelle, France, on May 9, 1915.

George Hillyard was at the time of the photograph secretary of the All England Club, and had been a tennis player of some repute himself, though he never won a Wimbledon title, twice finishing runner-up (1889 and 1890) in the doubles. In 1905, Hillyard lost to Wilding in the final of the Bad Homburg tournament, in Germany, but won (at the age of 44) gold in the 1908 London Olympics. An ex-Navy man, Hillyard rejoined for the duration, surviving and living to the age of 79. Interestingly, as well as both being first rate cricketers, Wilding and he were the same height – at 6ft 2in, they’d have not come across many taller contemporaries.

The picture reproduced here was first published in The Motor Cycle of July 10,1913, with the heading and caption thus: “TENNIS CHAMPIONS AS MOTOR CYCLISTS” going on to say, “A F Wilding last week retained his title as All England tennis champion by defeating M McLoughlin. He is seated in G W Hillyard’s Zenith-Gradua [custom-built Millford] sidecar. The engine is a special cycle car type JAP of 90mm bore by 85mm stroke, 10.8hp.”

Sporting a Leicestershire registration, Hillyard’s Zenith (alas, no longer on the DVLA registers) used one of the ohv ‘90 bore’ engines, with a capacity of 1082cc, making it just about the fastest thing on the road in its day, plus what a fantastic and stylish combination it is – a suitable choice of transport for its illustrious cargo.
 

DaveM

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Endurance Test

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Covering upwards of 2000 miles, on a 350cc sidecar outfit carrying two full-grown men, in February, sounds like purgatory, though it was in the name of publicity…

Image: Mortons Archive

On Monday, February 9, 1925, at approaching 9pm, a crowd gathers to watch the departure of a 350cc OK-Bradshaw, fitted with an OK Number 2 touring sidecar, on a 2000-mile nonstop trial. Occupying the appendage was an ACU observer, while there was a team of eight riders scheduled behind the Easting screen fitted to the motorcycle – the ACU-men (there were three of them, including Arthur Bourne, the others S T Huggett and T Pope) was afforded the same protection.

Most of the riders were OK agents in various parts of the country – they were J Edmondson (Keswick), R Hickman (Luton), G Sankey (Service Co., London), R Lawson (Bristol), Frank Hallam (Birmingham), plus OK head tester W J Johnson, A Johnson (another OK tester) and Jack Emerson, from Bradshaw engines; the experienced Emerson, whose competition career stretched back before the First World War, had finished sixth on a Bradshaw-engined DOT in the 1924 Junior TT.

The Motor Cycle of February 12, 1925, explained the motivation for the attempt: “In addition to proving that a 350cc sidecar outfit is capable of traversing the length and breadth of the country, the manufacturers wish to increase the confidence of the public in overhead valve gear – at least as far as Bradshaw engines are concerned – as they have faith in this type of unit and consider that the test will help to overcome much existing prejudice.”

The mentioned overhead valve engine was the Granville Bradshaw designed ‘oil boiler’, featuring an outside flywheel as well as the then relatively avant-garde valve-gear arrangement, plus oil cooling. But did it all work? That was the question the public wanted answering, hence the high-profile stunt. Starting from that 9pm start time, the outfit was to cover 2048 miles in 111 hours, 23 minutes, in a ‘star shaped route radiating from Birmingham.’ Although the aim of running nonstop was missed, total time the engine wasn’t running was apparently ‘about half an hour’ of which ‘…nine minutes was lost to carelessness, the tanks being allowed to run dry with a consequent delay in refuelling.’ The attempt finished at 12.30pm, on February 16.

The ‘involuntary stops’ in total numbered five, with several (four) being down to magneto issues, due to the inclement conditions occasionally encountered – not only was there heavy rain, but it also snowed too. The fifth was the aforementioned petrol foul-up. There were eight other stops, when ‘…the engine came to rest when idling, but was restarted in a matter of seconds.’ The average speed (including all the driver changes, the adjustments, the refuelling etc) was 18.39mph, with fuel and oil consumptions averaging 69.5mpg and 2128mpg respectively.

Motor Cycling (February 25, 1925) concluded its report thus: “At the conclusion of the test the combination was examined externally and the engine was partly dismantled for inspection. With the exception of the following, the whole outfit was found to be in excellent order: – Adjustment required to front brake, rear wheel bearings, secondary driving chain and the rear gear control. One spoke in the rear wheel was fractured. The engine was in very good condition, there was no appreciable wear in the bearings, the valves were not pitted and there was but a slight carbon deposit. Both inlet and exhaust tappets required adjustment. The petrol and oil used were BP and Castrol respectively.”

Despite the useful publicity, the firm of OK – a partnership between Ernie Humphries and Charles Dawes based in Hall Green, Birmingham, which built its first motorcycle in 1899 – was not long for the market, disbanded in 1926. Humphries promptly formed OK Supreme, while Dawes switched purely to bicycle manufacture; the works was passed onto Veloce/Velocette, although Dawes carried on making cycles in part of it, Dawes still being a bicycle manufacturer today, although it passed out of family ownership in the 1970s. Humphries was to make OK Supremes until 1940, the company’s highlight a 1928 Lightweight TT win.
 

DaveM

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TSS on trial

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The eight-valve Bonneville twin which could’ve perhaps been original Triumph’s saviour.

The ultimate Meriden twin? Perhaps it was, but, like so many things in the final 20 or so years of the ‘original’ British motorcycle industry, 1983’s TSS was more an example of what might’ve been, rather than what actually was.

It’s reported that around 440 of the genuine-120mph topping TSS 750cc twins were made – but they were also beset by niggling problems, under-developed, and something of a final hurrah that, with a little bit more thought and effort, and finance, could have perhaps been a machine that would’ve eked a bit more out of the famous old engine, albeit it wasn’t ever going to be a long-term solution. Though that may have come in the form of the 900cc DOHC twin that was also on the drawing boards as the lights dimmed, and then finally went out at Meriden.

The story of the TSS can be traced to the late 1960s, when Weslake (founded by Harry Weslake and famous for all manner of work, notably the engine in Dan Gurney’s race-winning Formula 1 car, Jaguar and Vanwall car work, speedway, aero and marine engines, among others) produced an eight-valve cylinder head kit, which could be fitted onto a Triumph bottom end. It was originally supplied by the Rickman brothers, makers of Metisse motorcycles, though later supplied by Weslake themselves. The kit upped capacity to 686cc and featured paired valves, operated from the pushrods by forked rockers. Importantly, it gave a useful performance boost.

In 1976, the rights to make the Weslake passed to the company owned by Dave Nourish, who died in the autumn of 2021. His Nourish Racing Engines (NRE) business was heavily involved in speedway, preparing Peter Collin’s Weslake single-cylinder motors, so, with Weslake struggling financially, NRE took over the four-valve speedway single and the eight-valve twin, which was used in, among others, John Hobbs’ famous drag racer, The Hobbit. In 1979, NRE provided Triumph with a kit for the T140 engine from which Meriden developed its own version, seemingly (and maddeningly) managing to introduce problems which there hadn’t been with the Weslake/NRE offering.

Standard T140 crankcases were used for the TSS, but there was a new shorter, stiffer, beefier one-piece crankshaft, to cope with the higher rpm the right valve head allowed – it was reckoned the TSS would rev to an eye-watering 10,000rpm and beyond, with 7000rpm the standard limit for a normal Triumph twin. There was a completely new aluminium cylinder block too, with its bores spaced half an inch further apart than the rest of the range, meaning the new connecting rods had to run slightly offset on the gudgeon pins at the small end.

The new result of this endeavour was an engine (now with flat-topped pistons owing to the cylinder head revisions) which made 59bhp, a not-to-be-sniffed at figure for a 750cc twin and one bhp up on the recently departed 828cc Norton Commando. But, sadly, shoddy manufacture meant that the first supplied examples of the new model suffered from porous cylinder head castings, and subsequent warranty claims pretty much strangled the TSS at birth, especially when allied to blowing cylinder head gaskets, as well as steel liners which slipped down the alloy barrels. It was all dispiriting and largely avoidable stuff, but instead of being the saviour, meant the TSS was just another nail in Triumph’s coffin.

In 1983, the last Triumph Bonneville left Meriden, as Triumph went into voluntary liquidation on August 26that year. In the wake of the collapse, house builder John Bloor bought the company, lock, stock and barrel, though lots of the spare parts and manufacturing plant went to Les Harris, who reached agreement to put the Triumph Bonneville back into production. The first machines were made in summer of 1985, with 1255 made before the licence agreement ran out in 1988, before Bloor’s Triumph, announced late in 1990, started production in 1991.

The new Bonneville arrived in 2001; of 790cc, its double overhead camshaft, eight-valve engine produced 61bhp, all showing that the men at Meriden weren’t far off the mark with their efforts, being what they had planned in the early 1980s.
 

grandpaul

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I had a TSS, and an '02 New Bonnie. Great bikes, both.
 

DaveM

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Muddied Waters

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Slightly mysterious Ariel, ridden by the Cambridge cox, as he arrives for training at Putney Boathouse, prior to the 1946 boat race.

Looking at this picture, there are things that don’t tie up, so we sent it over to the ever-helpful Roger Gwynne, at Ariel specialist Draganfly, to try and work out exactly what it is. He said: “It looks most likely to be a 1946 350cc NG, with side springs on forks (as used 1939-46), the small headlamp, which is postwar, and the small oil tank, so 350cc, not 500cc. Tank is probably black rather than red and the rims are all black so NG, not NH.

“But registration LMK 443 is a London number from May 1942, which does not match the image, as many features would not have been present on a bike built at that time, even if it had been built for a civilian organisation. I am not aware of any being built for anyone other than the Armed Forces except for a few for ‘FF,’ which may be ‘The Free French.’ The last civilian bike was dispatched in May 1941.

“The bike in the picture does have unusually high handlebars, usually found on ‘colonial’ models, but two inches taller than normal ones were used on the military W/NG. It isn’t clear, but the front wheel could be the smaller 6½in brake one as used on the W/NG, so this could be an ex-W/NG that has been ‘civilianised’ with a panel tank but retaining floppy W/NG pillion rests. The registration could be because it was used by the RAF or Royal Navy, I don’t know if they used civilian registrations. There was a contract for 100 bikes for the Navy that was built in dribs and drabs between January 24, 1942, and April 30, 1942, so it could be one of those. I would love to know the engine and frame numbers!”

There’s a fair bit about the W/NG in the concluding part of Richard Rosenthal’s Val Page profile (see page 66) but, suffice to say, it was based on the popular pre-Second World War 350cc Ariel single, with many servicemen happy to be allocated one – the super-modern telescopic-forked Matchless G3L apart, it was arguably the pick of the DR (dispatch rider) offerings.

The man riding this one is G H C Fisher, cox in the Cambridge boat for the 1946 boat race, which was the first to be held since 1939, cancelled on account of the Second World War. This was the 92nd running of the event, it first taking place in 1829, between teams from Cambridge and Oxford universities, over 4.2 miles on the River Thames between Putney and Moorlake. The first race was won by Oxford (who boasted an ‘Arbuthnot’ in their crew; the Abuthnot Trial being named after Rear-admiral Sir Robert Keith Arbuthnot, third place finisher in the 1908 TT and who went down with his ship, HMS Defence, at the battle of Jutland in 1916, though it’s impossible to determine if they were related) but it wasn’t until 1836 there was a second contest, won by Cambridge, then until 1856 it was an intermittent affair.

From then on though, it’s been held annually, interrupted only by the First and Second World Wars, and Covid-19 in 2020. In 2021 the race was held on the River Ouse near Ely, where, incidentally, an unofficial happening had taken place in 1944. These are the only two times it has not been on the Thames. The 2022 event is scheduled for April 3.

Despite his Ariel getting him back and forth to training, and despite Cambridge starting favourites, Fisher and his light blue crew were bested by Oxford’s dark blues, though Fisher was back the next year and enjoyed better fortune, as Cambridge triumphed in dismal weather. The 1947 win took Cambridge (in which Cambridge’s boat boasted five future Olympians) to a 49-43 advantage in overall victories; as of 2021, the tally for the men’s race stands at 85-80. There has also been a women’s race since being first held in 1927, becoming annual from 1934, and Cambridge won that in 2021 too; they have a win ratio of 45-30 in their favour in that event.
 

DaveM

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FROM THE ARCHIVE: The longest day

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France’s Bol d’Or 24-hour race celebrates its centenary this year. Here, we have a brilliant action photograph from the 1924 edition, where solos and sidecars ran together.

This rather remarkable action picture is taken from the June 19, 1924 edition of The Motor Cycle, the original caption reading thus: “One of the Rene Gillet drivers, whose passenger had a strenuous 24 hours.”

Yes, 24 hours – as the event in which the combination was taking part in was the Bol d’Or 24-hour race, held at Whitsuntide, on a road circuit (‘Circuit des Loges’) in the forest of St Germain, near Paris. The rider is Henriet, passenger unknown, though they finished third in their class, for 1000cc sidecars.

Both Motor Cycling and The Motor Cycle carried coverage of the event – with each leading their reports on the news that, in a sea of French, Belgian and Swiss motorcycles, it was a British-made Sunbeam, an early 493cc overhead valve parallel model ridden by 28-year-old Parisian marque agent Rene Francisquet, which ran out overall victor, despite the fact that of the 49 entries, just three were British-made – Bartlett on an AJS, who retired, and Minot’s Triumph, third in the 600cc sidecar class.

The Bol d’Or had started in 1922 at a circuit called ‘de Vajours,’ its home forone year, before three years at Circuit des Loges. There was a one season hiatus in 1927, with a different track used, before a return in 1928, until 1936. After that, it moved to Montlhery, using part of the speed bowl.

Post Second World War there was a 1947 return to the Circuit des Loges, before eventually back to Montlhery (1952-60), a break, two years at Montlhery (1969 and 1970), Le Mans 1971-77, Paul Ricard 1978-1999, then Magny Cours 2000-2014 before back to Paul Ricard to date.

The winner of the first two events had been Tony Zind, from Lyon, on a Motosacoche, but he couldn’t challenge in 1924, finishing well down the order, Francisquet enjoying (if that’s the right word!) his victory, by covering 951¾ miles in the period, completing 265 laps of the circuit. Second place went to Belgian Achille Hufkens, five laps shy of Francisquet, but well clear of his compatriot and fellow 350cc two-stroke Gillet rider Joseph Reinhartz, both clear of fourth finisher, Oswald Lambert, on a 500cc Gillet. Fifth was first sidecar, Swiss Ed Gex, with Mademoiselle Gex in the chair of the 1000cc Motosacoche, ahead of Lucien Lemasson on his remarkable 175cc French-made Thomann.

Our man Henriet managed 207 laps of the 3.59 miles circuit, compared to Gex’s 243 and Labourdette, the lead Rene Gillet V-twin, who covered 225. Fourth and fifth in class were two more Rene Gillets, piloted by Richard and Lecombe. Made initially in central Paris from around 1898, Rene Gillets were offered commercially from circa 1902, then from 1904, V-twins became the company mainstay. Commercial success led to a move to bigger premises in Montrouge, south of the city centre, while the big V-twins being made there found favour for their robust construction, being used extensively by the police and Army.

While updated versions of the big V-twins were produced post Second World War, later production focussed on small (up to 250cc) two-strokes, before the business closed in 1957. Incidentally, the factory is not to be confused with Gillet, which was a Belgian concern.

Rene Francisquet was to win again in 1925, again on a Sunbeam, before the Wolverhampton maker completed its hat-trick, with Damitao taking top honours in 1926. It wasn’t until 1931 there was another British maker (Velocette) to win, while Harley-Davidson claimed its only victory in 1938. Two rider teams were instigated in 1954, three rider teams in 1982.

The event wasn’t held in 2020, owing to Covid-19, but returned in 2021, with this year’s – the 100th anniversary – taking place over September 16-18. Riders will complete in teams of three and won’t be expected to eat and drink on the move, like Tony Zind did.
 

DaveM

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Book of the Week: Classic Superbikes II

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Our first book of the week for August is the recently published Classic Superbikes II by Frank Melling.

A classic superbike is a motorcycle which has universal appeal, regardless of your age or riding experience. It’s the bike you dream of riding – even if you’re a non-motorcyclist.

Bikes like this are inspirational and their stories need to be told with passion, enthusiasm and flair. These are not bikes for the measured tone and the meticulous recording of fuel consumption figures. Classic superbikes are about laying your life, or marriage, on the line just for the chance to ride one.

In this second volume devoted to the world’s finest motorcycles, Frank Melling returns to the garages wherein dwell some of the most powerful and unruly beasts ever to stalk the world’s highways and byways.

Classic Superbikes II is the follow up to Classic Superbikes, also by Frank Melling. It was published in July of 2022.

You can buy the book here.
 

DaveM

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PREVIEW: SEPTEMBER ISSUE OF THE CLASSIC MOTORCYCLE

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The September edition of The Classic MotorCycle magazine offers a lavishly illustrated celebration of legendary machines, riders and races, and news, reviews and rare period images from the golden age of motorcycling.

Drawing on an archive stretching back to 1903, The Classic MotorCycle magazine provides an unparalleled insight into more than a century of motorcycle design, development, riding, racing and much more.

The September issue includes:

Lusty lookalike​


Superbly crafted Velocette special, with the performance it delivers as good as the Venom Thruxton model it apes, though the electric-start replica benefits from better manners.

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Mystery machine​


With its engine made in 1904, how come this Fafnir (if that’s even what it really is…) appears on the Pioneer Register as 1911? ‘Period updates’ is the short answer.

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The last hurrah​


Final incarnation of the BSA Bantam was the best, while this B175 is still made to work for its living, being used as its maker intended, over half a century on from when made.

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Spanish trendsetter​


The dinky Montesa 125 Sprint was quite some goer, being the first two-stroke to secure a place on a GP podium, with second and third (plus fourth) in the 1956 125cc TT.

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A subscription to The Classic MotorCycle magazine means you can enjoy all of this, plus plenty of other benefits such as making a major saving on the cover price and FREE postage.

It’s quick and easy to sign up and, whether you do it online or over the phone, our team is ready and waiting to get your new deal under way or extend your current package.
 

DaveM

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The New Naughty 90s Hall at The Classic Motorcycle Mechanics Show

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‘Classic’ is in the eye of the beholder and well, it’s time for the new guard to make their mark at Stafford.

The Classic Motorcycle Mechanics Show is back in Stafford this October, and tickets are available here!

The brand-new Naughty 90’s hall, in association with Suzuki, will showcase the very best and most interesting future classics from the 1990s and early 2000s. You’ll find a mixture of clubs from the era and a display of individual, affordable bikes that you simply must have in your garage.

Meet the Editor of Classic Motorcycle Mechanics, Bertie Simmonds on his own special stand where you can listen to some 90’s music (a reminder of what you’d forgotten), play the PlayStation 1 against your mates (no expense spared), and chat to Bertie about his magazine, Classic Motorcycle Mechanics. Hell, he might even give you a free T-shirt if you subscribe!

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Oh and by the way, did we tell you we’ve got Niall Mackenzie’s 1992 Honda NR750? Yes, the oval piston beauty built by Honda…. because they could! It will take centre stage with Niall’s other beauty, a 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW-02. You’d better make a point of stopping by!

Have you got a 1990-2000’s classic bike? Would you like to display your motorcycle for the weekend? If so, you’ll get two free weekend passes, free camping and be in with a chance of winning one of many awards across the weekend including the ‘Best in Show’. Plus your bike will be admired by thousands of classic fans! Find out more here.
 

DaveM

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Morris Lubricants launch video series on how oil is made

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Morris Lubricants have released a new video series starring Guy Martin – designed to provide end users and distributors in the motorcycle trade with an insight into how oil is made and the factors that should be considered when choosing a lubricant supplier.

The series of five short videos demonstrates the key areas that should be considered when selecting oils and lubricants, to ensure maximum equipment life and reduced production downtime.

The videos feature Guy Martin, lorry mechanic, motorbike racer, TV presenter, engineering enthusiast and Morris Lubricants’ ambassador who is taken through the production process by the company’s Technology Manager Adrian Hill. He demonstrates the key areas that should be considered when selecting oils and lubricants, to ensure maximum reliability of components in engines and gearboxes.

A heavy goods vehicle mechanic by trade, Guy was eager to discover each stage of the manufacturing process and how oil is formulated to keep mechanical systems lubricated even in the toughest conditions.

“After spending time at the factory in Shrewsbury, I now appreciate the science and skill that goes into the oil production process,” said Guy. “I didn’t realise the company produced so many different varieties of oil and lubricants.

“It blew my mind when Adrian said that Morris Lubricants ships 12 containers of oil a week to countries as far away as New Zealand, Iraq and China and how much trust their international customers have in the product being made in Britain.”

Adrian added: “Guy was genuinely interested in the process, spontaneous with his comments and amazed by what goes on behind the scenes,” he said.

“He was excited by the prospect of trying something new and enjoyed filling a few barrels, capping them and putting the Morris Lubricants seals in place.

The process​


The video explains that the oil blending process is strictly monitored, beginning with the raw materials, which includes base oils and additive chemistry being delivered into the Shrewsbury manufacturing facility.

A stringent quality assurance process is then followed. All the base oil and additives delivered to the company are quarantined, sampled and sent to the on-site quality control (QC) laboratory where they are subjected to a suite of tests to ensure they are suitable for use. The Morris Lubricants’ QC laboratory currently conducts more than 5,000 quality control tests a month.

Once approved, these materials are released for production and are then carefully blended together, in compliance with strict formulation guidelines, to produce the finished high quality lubricant.

Each oil product is specially formulated to meet the needs of individual applications alongside strict global and original equipment manufacturers’ (OEM) specifications.

The blended lubricant is then sampled, sent to the QC laboratory and subjected to a series of chemical and physical tests. This ensures the formulation has been followed exactly.

When approved by the QC laboratory, the sample is released for filling. Once again, before filling begins, a final sample is taken from the filling head and checked a final time to ensure compliance.

The approved lubricant can then be filled into the appropriately labelled and batch numbered package. The pack sizes filled with lubricant ranges from 1 litre bottles, 5 litre contours and 25 litre drums to 205 litre barrels as well as bulk containers. This process ensures full traceability of the quality of the finished product.

The finished product is palletised, stored and then shipped out to customers in the UK or overseas. 44 million litres of product leave the company’s two manufacturing sites per annum, with 12 shipping containers leaving Shrewsbury every week to supply quality products to customers all around the world.

Guy Martin and Adrian Hill.

Adrian talks Guy through how oil is made.

About the episodes


The video series starts with Episode one and highlights the arrival of various high quality raw materials coming from the numerous suppliers based all around the world.

Episode two covers the processes that are conducted in the QC laboratory which conducts more than 5,000 tests a month.

Episode three explains the computer-controlled blending process and an eco-friendly ultrasonic technique which has cut blending time from 60 to 10 minutes. The company has the versatility to blend volumes from 200 to 70,000 litres.

Episode four takes viewers to the filling lines where various packaging formats are available to satisfy a diverse range of customers.

Episode five focuses on storing and shipping products which each have tamper-proof seals. The company ships oil and lubricants around the globe with 12 containers leaving Shrewsbury every week.

The video series has been launched on Morris Lubricants website and Facebook and can be viewed at bit.ly/MorrisOil
 
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