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DaveM

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Early Stafford news

The Carole Nash International Classic MotorCycle Show, to be held over April 25/26, at Stafford showground, celebrates its 40th anniversary this year.

2020 also marks the 75th anniversary of VE Day, so something of a 1940s theme will be instigated, with several historic machines from the period – including the Norton bought brand-new by then movie star George Formby, with Formby impersonator Graeme Hardy (see below), expected to be there.

Additionally, there’ll be a couple of aeroplanes too, in the form of a full-size Spitfire and Hurricane, while clubs are being asked to embrace the theme, with dressing up in period garb encouraged, not just by the clubs, but by people attending.

To add to the outdoor appeal, a Merlin aircraft engine will join the usual motorcycles in the start-up area.

Details are still being confirmed, but it all looks to be adding up to quite some event.



Of course there’ll be all the usual attractions, too, with a gargantuan in- and outdoor jumble, while among the star guests expected are Stuart Graham, who not only was a top level racer himself in the 1960s, riding works Hondas and Suzukis, but is also the son of Les Graham, the inaugural (1949) 500cc world champion – Graham senior earlier having served as a bomber pilot during the Second World War.

It’s hoped there’ll be an AJS Porcupine at the show too, of the type used by Les Graham in his successful title year.

As show time nears, there’ll be more exciting news emerging.

To buy advance tickets call 01507 529529 or visitwww.classicbikeshows.com

Read more News and Features in the March 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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DaveM

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Telford off-road show

The Classic Dirt Bike show, sponsored by Hagon Shocks, takes place at Telford over the weekend of February 15/16, and has American trials star and 1979 world trails champion Bernie Schreiber and also 1970 British 500cc motocross champ Bryan ‘Badger’ Goss as joint guests of honour.



Details from www.classicbikeshows.com or 01507 529529.

Read more News and Features in the March 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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DaveM

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Amazing opportunity

Team Obsolete is seeking a skilled race mechanic/engine builder for their Brooklyn, New York, shop.

This is a unique opportunity to work on the world’s most exotic ‘Holy Grail’ historic race bikes, such as Hailwood’s Honda 250cc ‘six,’ Agostini’s MV Agusta multis, AJS Porcupine and Triple Knocker, Dick Mann’s G50s, Gold Stars and BSA triples, ex-works AJS 7Rs, and much more.


The Team Obsolete AJS Porcupine, brought to and run at Cadwell Park in 2001.

Occasional overseas travel is possible.Please email resume and cover letter to:bikes@teamobsolete.com

Read more News and Features in the March 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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grandpaul

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I sure wish Rob and Team Obsolete would get over their differences and get back into racing in the US with AHRMA which has become the far and away biggest and most diverse US vintage roadracing organization...
 

DaveM

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Les Archer (1929-2019)

Les Archer, European 500cc Motocross Champion in 1956, died at his home in Spain just before Christmas. He was 90.

Born on February 27, 1929, Archer was born into a family of racers – his dad was a New Imperial (among others) works rider and record-breaker of high repute, while grandfather Jim was proprietor of Archers of Aldershot.

In fact it was a family of motorcyclists, as Les junior’s aunts Thelma and Joan made Brooklands record attempts too. So young Les was indoctrinated early.

As a teenager, he had his first taste of racing, and was third at the 1948 250cc Clubman’s TT, before his Manx GP bow later that year, which ended unsuccessfully; but he did win the Hutchison 100 on one of Joe Ehrlich’s EMCs.

But Les is best remembered for his off-road prowess, where he’d also been competing. Speaking to Andy Westlake for our June 2010 issue he explained: “When I tried to catch Geoff Duke on the hard stuff I fell off but on the rough stuff he was no trouble, so I took that as a message!”



An early off-road success was ISDT gold in 1950, and he went into scrambling/motocross with a 250cc Velocette special and a 500cc Norton, based on a 500T – the start of a long Norton association.

He debuted his famous 500cc overhead camshaft Norton in 1952, a machine specifically designed and developed to make him the king of Europe.

He was part of Britain’s victorious 1952 and 1953 Motocross des Nations teams and after he beat the brilliant Belgian Auguste Mingels at the 1953 Luxemburg GP, he knew he had it in him. It all came together in 1956, as he won the championship, with maximum points.

Archer continued to race his Nortons for many seasons, always there or thereabouts, before in 1966 he sold the whole equipe, and decide to swap to a Greeves two-stroke.

But a crash on a borrowed Triumph-powered Rickman Metisse, resulting in a busted collarbone and finger, made him decide to call it a day, after 21 years of racing.

He retired to Spain, where he passed away on December 18, 2019. A memorial service was held in Fareham on January 13, 2020.

Read more News and Features in the March 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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DaveM

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Bonhams at Stafford

There’s some interesting machinery already confirmed for Bonhams’ April Stafford sale, in particular, a couple of rare vintage V-twins.

One, a 1927 Matchless M3/S, of 990cc, right; the other a 1928 Montgomery, powered by a 680cc V-twin JAP engine, above.

Vintage Matchless machines seem to have only survived in penny numbers, with this type of V-twin especially unusual; the usual khaki-coloured machines are relatively often seen at appropriate events (though again not in numbers) but this type, featuring a Brough Superior-esq saddle tank, is hardly ever in evidence. Estimate is £28,000-35,000.



Montgomeries are hardly thick on the ground either, V-twins especially so, making this middleweight an attractive proposition.

Founded in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, Montgomery – as a concern – moved to Coventry before the First World War and continued to build a variety of proprietary engined machines through the vintage period and into the 1930s. Estimate is £25,000-35,000.



Elswehere in the sale, there’s a pair of overhead camshaft 350cc AJS models – one 1929, one 1930 – as well as a raft of café racers, including a Neville Evans Manxman, the 1980s built single which was based heavily on the single overhead camshaft Norton.

More details from bonhams.com

Read more News and Features in the March 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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DaveM

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Mark, Mortimer and the Moto-chariot


The Southern Off-Road and Racing Show at Kempton Park was held on December 7, once more showing that classic sport is alive, well and thriving.

Words and photographs: ALAN TURNER


Kempton Park Race Course (horses, not bikes) was established more than 140 years ago, but for the last 30 of those, it has also been a venue for motorcycle jumbles.

It quickly became a popular occasion, drawing traders and private sellers, and buyers, from many miles distant. The introduction of a show element, which took advantage of the space and facilities at Kempton, took things to another level.

For many years, Eric Patterson was the guiding light and he has now passed over the organisational reins, but he remains a regular Kempton presence.

His stand featured a newly published book that charts the history of the jumbles. While the laws of supply and demand dictate trading conditions, jumbles also mirror the changes in the classic motorcycle scene.

In recent years, an increasing number of bikes have been brought in from the continent. Obscure manufacturers and sometimes ‘barn-find’ conditions are obviously challenges that are not to be undertaken lightly.


Haggling spoken here? Stalls (and bargains) stretch way into the Kempton distance.

There’s still plenty of potential British bikes for restoration, but the price tags on some indicate a level of optimism, contrasting with some Japanese offerings that could, at least, be secured with a reasonable outlay.

The off-road theme was notably prevalent at Kempton on this occasion, with enough trials bikes, or feasible projects, to equip possibly the entire entry for a centre-level mud plug.

Prices also seemed reasonable for usable off-roading entertainment, although the traditional big British singles needed far thicker wallets.

With possibly everything needed for bike, rider and workshop somewhere out in the jumble area, the show area in the basement of Kempton Park’s enormous grandstand was just as full. Within was a wonderfully diverse array of machinery covering the mainstream sporting disciplines, as well as the lesser-known ones, such as motoball.

With many club members on hand to talk about their choices, visitors would soon have their curiosity satisfied.

Competition for the best club stand was as keen as ever, with a great deal of effort put in to provide something different and eye-catching.

The Bultaco Club managed to feature a wide variety of the Spanish manufacturer’s output, the Normandy Club (a Surrey town, not France) also had variety, but ‘The Friends of Speedway’ were judged to have eclipsed everyone with speedway bikes and memorablilia, as well as special guest, four-times World Speedway champion Barry Briggs.

The uniquely US version of speedway, Flat Track, has gradually established itself in this country as a sporting discipline, as well as a fashion statement.

Offering encouragement, The Ace Café London has sponsored the Flat Track category at Kempton for several past shows.



The marriage of British machinery and functional US style offers a way of building something that is unusual but, with a few compromises, can also have the option of being ridden on the road.

The workmanship that had gone into Bob Frearson’s 1972 Triumph Trident-powered effort merited the top prize.

The broad church of Kempton is no better illustrated than in the ‘Highly Commended’ awards. From the prewar years, Peter Crummett’s superb Rudge and Max Groves’ Manx Norton were reminders of some of the more coveted machines of that era.

The Bantam Preservation Group managed well, as the club has only been in existence for three months, but is claiming 33 members so far.

One of the stand’s attractions was courtesy of member Steve Mitchell, who had rescued a genuine 1951 works BSA Competition Bantam.

The factory took this event seriously and the bike bristled with rider aids in its detail alterations. Successfully ridden by Fitzroy Allen to claim a gold medal in the ISDT of that year, it also took part in the 1952 and 1954 events.

After its last outing, and still retaining its official seals on many of the critical parts, the bike vanished into a shed for many years.

The engine was seized when Steve rescued it, so he took care to cause minimal disturbance to the provenance before he got the engine up and running once more.

John Seward’s Honda Elsinore recalled the time when the Japanese manufacturer was taking a serious interest in the burgeoning US off-road market.

Any one from the line of superbly prepared classic road-racers of the BRT stable could probably justify an award, but Neil Brailsford’s Tricati was the one that received the rosette. Dave Hutchens’ Daval König racer recalled an interesting period of road-racing in the Seventies.

When competitive 500cc race machinery for the privateer was no longer available, the light, powerful flat four German two-stroke engine seemed to be an answered prayer. The reality was not quite so straightforward.

The award-winning bike was the third of a trio, built in 1979 and the result of a six-year restoration.



The top three bikes at Kempton also reflected the show’s all-encompassing nature. Third was Dave Massam’s 125cc EMC-Puch, a rare survivor of when Dr Joe Ehrlich was pursuing theories on two-stroke design and came up with some successful road-racers.

In the ever-popular fire-up paddock the EMC was more than capable of holding its own in the onslaught on the ears! It provided an interesting contrast to the various four-strokes that were also demonstrated to the applause of an appreciative crowd.

Second place went to a 1963 Rickman Metisse belonging to Trevor Childs. The products of the Rickman brothers gave an economy in style to solid, functional engineering.

Still highly regarded in classic off-road events, the bikes are also in demand from collectors.

Best in Show was a fitting tribute to Robin Rhind-Tutt, who passed away recently. His Wasp engineering concern was also engaged in providing off-road machinery, but with the near-demise of the British bike industry, suitable power-trains had to come from elsewhere.


Best club stand – Friends of Speedway.

Mark Ramplee’s Wasp outfit had a Yamaha XS twin, enlarged to 840cc from its original 650cc. This considerable capacity hike still did not cause the engine undue stress.

The outfit was the dominant part of the Mortimer Classic Club’s display, an organisation that takes satisfaction in offering a busy programme of trials and motocross with a strong element of tradition.

With so much to see, Kempton is an intense experience, which is why the ‘Early Birds’ option of pre-opening admission is a popular one for the more determined buyers.

Recently, Kempton Park’s long-term future had been in doubt when the Jockey Club, its owners, had announced its intention to sell the land for housing development.

However, the local council has decided that Kempton should remain part of the green belt, so hopefully the jumbles and shows also have a bright future.

Read more News and Features in the March 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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DaveM

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It’s Jim and maybe Cecil

Rereading the story about Jackie White (February 2020 issue) and the request for names of other riders in the picture – well, number 52 is definitely Jim Squib, who came from the New Forest area.

He was a member of the Southampton speedway team in 1947 (I have individual pictures of the whole team on postcards) and your picture would date from a couple of years later.
Next to him is possibly Cecil Bailey, another team member who went on to take many photos for Motor Cycle News and other publications.


Thanks to Bob Buck we know number 52 is Jim Squib, 54 maybe Cecil Bailey, 51 Jackie White. Any more for any more?

The 250cc Ariel in the picture was in 1959/60 in the shed of Jim Marriott, of Hammonds Green, Totton, and Jim was very proud of the fact it was Jackie’s old bike.

As an aside, my father worked in the early 1950s for ‘Stonewall’ Jackson, Old MJ’s (Mike Jackson) father, and found MJ riding his (my father’s) motorbike around the grounds of the Jackson house in Chilworth, Southampton. When MJ was given a Greeves, he evidently ploughed a furrow across the lawns…

Bob Buck, via email

PS. We met once when you were returning from an event in Ireland, fuelling your van near Narberth, west Wales, when I barged past just to see what bikes you had in the van. Old motorcyclists are just born nosey where bikes are concerned!

Read more Letters, Opinion, News and Features in the March 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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DaveM

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Celebrating heroic women in motorcycling for International Women’s Day

Forget about motorcycling being a lads’ world. There are – and always have been – plenty of women riding fast and far.

As part of International Women’s Day, we’ve teamed up with Mortons Archive to celebrate extraordinary women in motorcycling. Here are just a few of the greats…

Beryl Swain

International Women's Day


Beryl Swain became first woman to race at the Isle of Man TT on a 50cc Itom in 1962.

Certainly among the most influential, Beryl finished 22nd out of 25 finishers, with an average of 48mph on her 50cc Itom. Unfortunately, the racing world was not ready for fast women back then, and banned them from riding the TT circuit until 1978.

Marjorie Cottle

Marjorie Cottle


An International Six Day Trial legend of the 1920s and 30s, Marjorie Cottle led an all-female British team to win the Silver Vase in 1927.

Marjorie Cottle was one of Britain’s best-known motorcyclists in the 1920s, and considered to be one of the greatest trial riders in the country – male or female. She won several medals in her career, including gold at the Scottish Six Days Trial in 1923, and the Silver Vase at the International Six Days Trial in the Lake District in 1927, as part of an all-female team along with Edyth Foley and Louie McLean.

In the process she became a walking advertisement for women in motorcycling. Marjorie’s success had a direct impact on the rise of another female rider’s career, as Jessie Ennis (née Hole) became a New Imperial works rider in 1927.

Edyth Foley



Part of the all-female British team that won the Silver Vase in 1927, alongside Marjorie Cottle and Louie McLean.

Louie McLean



Louie McLean: “Everybody’s favourite and a wonderful rider.” One of only nine riders to finish with a clean score card at 1925 ISDT.

Elspeth Beard

elspeth beard


Elspeth Beard, the first English woman to ride around the world, began her journey in 1982 on a BMW R60/6. From the UK, she shipped her bike to New York City, riding on to Canada, Mexico and Los Angeles.

Then it was shipped to Sydney, and Elspeth spent a good while travelling in Australia. Next she travelled to Singapore, riding back into Europe across Asia. She arrived back in the United Kingdom in 1984, having travelled 48,000 miles. She published a book, Lone Rider, about her travels, which came out in July 2017.

Theresa Wallach

Theresa Wallach


Theresa Wallach was one of the trailblazers. Born in London in 1909, Theresa went on to become a racer, motorcycle adventurer, military dispatch rider, engineer, author, motorcycle dealer, mechanic
and riding school instructor.

In 1935 Theresa and her friend, Florence Blenkiron, rode from the UK down to South Africa on a 600cc single-cylinder Panther with a Watsonian sidecar and a homemade trailer. Crossing the Sahara, riding through equatorial Africa, and finally arriving in Cape Town, they managed the whole trip with no back-up – not even a compass to hand.

Following the trip, Theresa wrote a book, The Rugged Road, which tells the story of their epic ride.

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Rocky

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Amazing ladies TUP
 

DaveM

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Raleigh information request

For a number of years I have been researching in the Nottingham Archives for information on Raleigh motorcycles and cars, with a view to writing a book on the subject.

As is usual with research, I have come across a number of loose ends, as the archives are by no means complete, and wonder if any readers can help with any behind-the-scenes information.

In 1898/9, Raleigh were disposing of their Paris cycle depot and warehouse due to poor sales, and initially negotiated with a Mr Bertrand and then Mr Rousseau to buy all the cycles and stock.

There is much mention of motors from Barraquand &Marre. Tantalisingly, there are listed ‘243 pairs of tyres on m/cs’ and later‘58 m/cs’ which were not returned.

Could these be Raleigh cycles with engines fitted in France, as Raleigh didn’t officially enter the motorcycle market until 1901, with a front wheel drive model?

Is this reference to ‘m/cs’ actually motorcycles, or just a typo?

They then produced motorcycles, three-wheelers (Raleighette) and a prototype car until 1906/7. In 1913/14, they made a lightweight car, which might have gone into production just before the First World War, as I have come across adverts from dealers selling these in 1915.

Raleigh returned to motorcycle production in 1921 with a flat twin and then various models ranging from a 174cc unit construction Model 17 up to a V-twin, until 1933.

There was a Model 18 listed in 1928 using many parts from the Model 17, but with a separate 174cc sv engine and gearbox.

We know prototypes were made and listed in the 1928 catalogue, but they were not sold in this country.


The Sultan of Zanzibar, and his son, visit the Raleigh works in 1929. Raleigh products were sold throughout the world, with bicycles the company’s mainstay. Image: Mortons Archive.

The story goes that kits of parts were sold to a French manufacturer, who produced their own version with a different tank and larger engine. Is this correct? And has anyone seen one?

From 1931 to 1935/6, Raleigh produced various three-wheelers, mainly vans, but also a Safety Seven Car. When production ceased at the end of 1935, some of the workforce left and started Reliant.

Raleigh then came back into motorised transport in 1958 with their range of mopeds and scooters, mainly made under licence until 1971.

There are gaps in their model numbering system from RM1 to RM12 i.e. RM7 and RM10. I believe the RM7 was the Wisp, although I have a photo of an R16 Poweride, which looks the same as a Wisp.

I also have a photo of the RM10 which seems to have the Mobylette engine with a smaller frame and wheels, but did not go into production. Maybe someone who worked in the design department might be able to help?

Over my years of research, I have come across mention of two, three and four-cylinder models in the late 1920s, a Villiers-engined lightweight in 1931, none of which reached production. Maybe they were only design exercises?

So, if anyone can fill in some of the gaps or has any other information, or better still worked at Raleigh in the 1960s and had experience of the motorised side of their business, I would be delighted to hear from you. Please contact me on dcomber @btinternet.com.

Dave Comber, via email.

Read more Letters, Opinion, News and Features in the March 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!


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DaveM

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Pioneer Run’s new destination

The Sunbeam Motor Cycle Club has announced a new destination for the finish of its annual Pioneer Run for some 300 Veteran motorcycles, tricycles, quadricycles and combinations.



Starting at Tattenham Corner, Epsom, at around 8am on Sunday, March 22, 2020 the final destination will be Brighton City Airport at Shoreham, where machines will start arriving at lunchtime.

Read more News and Features in the April 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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DaveM

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South of England show

Guest of honour at Elk Promotions’ show, at the South of England showground at Ardingly, West Sussex, onMarch 29, will be legendary Triton builder, racer and raconteur Dave Degens.

Additionally, the show boasts five indoor halls, with all manner of attractions.


Dave Degens fettling a Dresda at his Putney premises in the 1960s.

If you enter your pre-1980 classic into the show before March 1, then you’ll be sent a pass which will let you in free.

Visit www.elk-promotions.co.uk for details, or contact Julie Diplock on 01797 344277.

Read more News and Features in the April 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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Prewar singles to the fore at H&H

One of the star lots at H&H’s sale at the National Motorcycle Museum on April 7, will include this 1938 Vincent-HRD Meteor, below, which was discovered incomplete in a barn, and subsequently restored over 10 years to its current condition.

Specialists Maughan and Sons and Conway Motors have been involved in its rebirth. It has an optional Jaeger eight day clock, recently restored and in good running order.

The Meteor has been dated and inspected by the Vincent Owners’ Club, with paperwork included. Copies of the original works order and original engine specification are included. Estimate is £30,000-40,000.



Other eye-catchers include this unusual 1930 Norton CS1 (below), which has been in its current ownership since the 1960s.

When sold, 100% of the proceeds of this Norton is going towards the purchase of the local church, built by the current owner’s distant relative.

Bought in approximately 1969 in a dismantled state by the current seller, the CS1 was untouched and kept in boxes due to moving around the country for RAF duties, before restoration started in 2003 on retirement, with the engine restored by well-known Norton tuner Francis Beart’s mechanic Keith Manning. Estimate is £25,000-£27,000.



Details on these and all the other lots (which includes veterans and several Vincents) from www.handh.co.uk

Read more News and Features in the April 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

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DaveM

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The world’s oldest?

My name is Tim Millard and I am the current MD of Millard & Co Ltd, in Guernsey.

I wondered if you would be interested to find out about a recent Facebook campaign we started, to find the oldest motorcycle shop in the world.

The campaign has currently received about 40,000 views and shares worldwide and a lot of informative feedback. However, to date, no one knew of, or could suggest, a motorcycle shop that is as old as Millards, and still in existence.

This all came about after the recent passing of one of our family and the discovery about an article in the Wiltshire Times on February 26, 1896, reporting my great-grandfather, Thomas Millard, selling the first motorised tricycle from his shop in the area.

The customer paid about £100 for this machine and the article reports him taking delivery from the shop in Fore Street, Trowbridge, and his subsequent ride to Beckington.

The event attracted a crowd of onlookers so large, it blocked the wide road in front of the premises.


Is there an older dealer than Millards? If so, do let us know.

We therefore wondered if you would like to offer this ‘challenge’ up to your readership – to find a motorcycle shop that is still in existence that has documented evidence of its first motorcycle/tricycle sale dating earlier than February 26, 1896.

If there is a motorcycle shop anywhere in the world that can beat that, we will happily concede our claim to the title.

As a little bit of background… Thomas Millard started out in business in 1887 selling cycles.

Six years later, he was manufacturing pedal powered two-wheelers and at some point prior to February 26, 1896 started selling motorcycles/tricycles.

The business continued and moved to Guernsey in 1908. The shop has been involved in the manufacture and sale of motorcycles and became a BSA dealer in 1917. It is still owned and run by the same family.

Tim Millard, Guernsey.

Read more Letters, Opinion, News and Features in the April 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!


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DaveM

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Subscribe today and you’ll pay only £9.99 for the first 5 issues. Bargain! Once you’re signed up, the latest issue will load straight onto your device. You can enjoy quality features, restoration advice, buying guides and brilliant photography from the comfort of your own home.

Subscribe today and you’ll pay only £9.99 for the first 5 issues. Bargain!
Whether you want to take a trip back to the golden era of motorcycling in The Classic MotorCycle, read about the best British bikes of yesteryear in Classic Bike Guide, take a nostalgic look at the glory days of racing in Classic Racer or revel in the nuts and bolts of real classic motorcycles in RealClassic, put your feet up and enjoy a digital subscription of 5 issues for only £9.99 on your computer, tablet or phone.

Taking out a digital subscription couldn’t be easier. Just follow these four simple steps!

  1. Head over to www.classicmagazines.co.uk/digmar20
  2. Pick your favourite title in our mega sale
  3. Checkout
  4. Sit, back, relax and read as the latest issue will instantly load onto your favourite device.

Want some more inspiration? There are even more digital subscriptions for only £9.99 at www.classicmagazines.co.uk/digmar20 on a range of titles covering classic and modern motorcycles, lifestyle, scootering and railways.

And, if you’re looking for a good book to read while you’re at home, www.mortonsbooks.co.uk has a range of quality non-fiction books catering for every interest.

The post Stuck indoors? Read your favourite magazine on any device! appeared first on The Classic Motorcycle.
 

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Scorton Giant Auto and Bike Jumble cancelled

The Scorton Giant Auto and Bike Jumble’s March 21 and April 18 dates have been cancelled due to concerns over Covid-19 spread.

Image of a sign saying cancelled in relation to the cancelled Scorton event


The Giant Auto and Bike Jumble usually takes place at Scorton, near Catterick in North Yorkshire, every third Saturday of the month. However, the government has advised strongly against mass gatherings, resulting in many event cancellations across the UK.

If you have any enquiries, the event organisers are available on 01995 604142.


The post Scorton Giant Auto and Bike Jumble cancelled appeared first on The Classic Motorcycle.
 

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40th Carole Nash Classic Motorcycle Show postponed until June 2020

Carole Nash Classic Motorcycle Show postponed until June


Following the recent announcement from the UK Government, Mortons Events has had to postpone the 40th Carole Nash Classic Motorcycle Show which was due to be held on April 25-26.

The safety and well-being of our visitors, exhibitors, partners, contractors and staff is the most important factor and the key reason for postponing the event.

The events team have been continually monitoring the latest public health and Government guidelines regarding the evolving COVID-19 situation and acting in accordance with their advice.

We have secured new dates for the show at the Stafford County Showground which will now take place on Friday, June 12 and Saturday, June 13, 2020. All ticket and trade bookings will be honoured for this new date. However, if you are unable to make this new date, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

For all ticket enquiries please contact our Customer Services team on 01507 529529 or email customerservices@mortons.co.uk

For all trade enquiries please contact our Shows team on 01507 529430 or email exhibitions@mortons.co.uk – Lines are open Monday-Friday, 8.30am-5pm.

Thank you all for your patience, understanding and support in these unprecedented times.

The post 40th Carole Nash Classic Motorcycle Show postponed until June 2020 appeared first on The Classic Motorcycle.
 

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Back on track


After last year’s postponement caused by heavy snow, it was reassuring that this year’s Bristol Classic Show went ahead with no such drama.

Words: JAMES ROBINSON Photographs: GARY CHAPMAN


Best in Show winner Jim Devereux was delighted to pick up the premier award with his incredibly rare four-valve 1931 Ariel SG Sloper, a machine that was actually restored a few years back, but is still in tip-top condition, its black and chrome glistening under the show lights.

It was displayed on the Stonehenge section of the VMCC’s stand – always a place where standards are high, with several other prize winners part of the display.

Also proud with Jim’s prize-winning performance was Sammy Miller, the evergreen trials, road racing and museum curating legend, having taken Jim on at the museum, with the Ariel more than likely not proving too bad a ‘CV’ if one wants a job restoring motorcycles.



The full story of its rebuild was covered in our February 2014 issue, while in the interim it’s not simply been hidden away and stored, but used, making its still-stunning appearance even more praiseworthy.

There were a couple of fresh restorations that picked up prizes too, the first being Andy Burbidge’s wonderful 1960 Triumph Bonneville ‘Thruxton’.

Not to be confused with the later unit-type Thruxton Bonneville machines, Andy’s is a one-year-only rarity, and he explained how it all came about: “It came to me as a standard 1960 T120 Bonneville and I bought it from Cliff Rushworth at Ace Classics,” he explains, “and Cliff encouraged me to do it to Thruxton spec, it being the only year it was offered.”

Handily, Cliff was able to supply most of the parts too, including a one-gallon oil tank, rear sets, different handlebars and plug-in headlamp, among other things.

Andy did stray from ‘catalogue’ though with his silencers, deciding that he fancied megas – and very well they look too – while also wanting a lighter shade of brown/gold paint for the magneto, again to his own personal taste.


Tangerine Dream anyone? Well-presented 1959 Bonneville gets closely inspected.

For the show regular (and regular winner) the pre-unit Bonnie offers something of a departure, his usual forte being the Triumph Trophy Trail/Adventurer series. “I’m down to 12 bikes now,” he confessed, “though most of them are Trophy Trails.” He had “a lot more” but has passed on several.

With the newly-finished Bonnie, it really did go down to the wire. “I finished it early last week – it was taken off the bench on Friday morning and it started up straight away, it sounds lovely.

“I’m looking forward to getting it home, putting it on the road and getting it run-in.”
The restoration took Andy four months, 300 hours or 35 working days, depending how one would prepare to categorise it!

His efforts won him the Best Postwar prize, of which there could be little dispute. There was barely a moment at the show when someone wasn’t taking a picture of it.


Jim Devereux was delighted to claim Best in Show with his unusual Ariel.

There’s not many people who have taken home more silverware from the Bristol show than Alan Smith, from just up the road – well, the M4 – in Swindon.

This year Alan had another exquisitely detailed AJS, a 1928 side-valve, which looked to be a fabulous restoration, though closer examination and questing revealed that wasn’t necessarily so.

“It’s completely built up out of bits,” he recounts. “I’ve had the frame kicking about for years. I think I bought it and the forks in 2004. The engine came with a load of bits from Australia, I actually got it as part of a swap deal.

“I bought the gearbox at Founders Day while the valve lifter mechanism came from a chap, Jari, in Finland, who’s part of the vintage AJS community, as part of another deal.

“The wheels were interesting. Dale Sole (son of the late Pete, another multiple award winner, while Dale still exhibits at least one of his dad’s bikes) called me up from an autojumble somewhere, and said he was looking at some vintage AJS wheels, which the seller thought were either 1927 or 1928.


Best Veteran was this sparkling Rudge Multi. Nice indeed.

“They’re not quite the same and turned out to be 1927, but we were able to make them work. The front hub, though, was made completely from scratch, rough machined by someone and then finished off by my friend (and fellow AJS guru) Ray Carter. We increased the width of the hub too, which gives a better brake.

“Obviously, if I’d have had a Big Port (so 350cc ohv) engine I’d have used that, but actually these little side-valves go really well. Though he do have to rev ’em.”

Anyway, Alan already has two Big Ports, as well as a ‘cammy,’ so the side-valve nicely completes the set and it sparkled on the North Wilts Motorcycle Club stand, joined by plenty of other desirable and interesting pieces of machinery, including Cyril Griffiths’ lovely, cobby and purposeful 1924 350cc Omega-JAP.

Less sparkling but no less interesting was Mike Stocks’ 1942 Harley-Davidson WLC, chosen as Best Military, with the attention to detail of the other bits and pieces Mike has collected adding to the appeal of his display. But even better, Mike rides the Harley pretty much every day.

“I’m a tattooist and I park it outside my shop, where it always attracts attention. It’s a great talking point.

“It’s also easy to look after and dead reliable – you just put fuel and oil in it, kick it over a few times, and away it goes. It did take a little bit of getting used to – the hand change and the foot clutch – but now it’s second nature.”


This trio of Douglas 600cc twins had an interesting shared history, living together for many years. Paul Wirdnam’s is in the centre. The three shared the Jeff Clew Endeavour award.

So enamoured is he with his Harley, he now has two. His children love it too – it has ‘Elsie’ painted on the petrol tank, as that was how it was christened by the youngsters, owing to it being a (W) LC.

Mike went on to say: “I’ve learned so much from having owned it, and collecting up all sorts of bits and pieces.”

He opened up one of his panniers and started getting out all sorts of things, including a French/English dictionary.

Explaining further, he told how it’s not possible to tell if his machine actually saw service as, post-Second World War, most were sent to Holland and all records were lost, as they ended up in civilian hands.

So whether Mike’s example was on the beach at Normandy in 1944 is unknown, but it has still got sand in its tyres now, owing to a commemorative event on Saunton beach. He’s even raced a tank on the sand aboard the Harley!

Elsewhere there were some other lovely things to look at and marvel over, including Henry Body’s remarkable Douglas sprinter on which he was unbeatable for decades – literally – while the Lew Coffin award (Lew was a show regular for many years) went, fittingly, to a rakish Mk.1 cammy Velo grasstracker, while it was a pleasure to gaze upon Brian Casely’s factory-built ISDT Tribsa, which picked up a pot for Best Off-roader.

There were many later classics – the Japanese being well-represented – while there was a good helping of early machines too, notably more than in recent years or at other shows.

All in all it was a good show, with a cheerful spirit evident throughout the showground all weekend.

View more images of this event and read more News and Features in the April 2020 issue of The Classic Motorcycle – on sale now!

The post Back on track appeared first on The Classic Motorcycle.
 
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