Triumph TR6RV Tiger Restoration; 26+ Years Sitting

BAinLA

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" Yes, Avon Roadriders "
Thanks grandpaul. I've been searching for these but only see tubless for sale.

" As for tires, i'd go for Dunlop TT100's. These are excellent tires and retain the 'period' look!! When it comes to staying upright in the wet, cheap rubber might be last thing on your list. Best of luck with everything mate."
Thank you Bristle. I'll look for these as well. Staying upright is definitely a high priority! Fortunately we don't get rain here in Los Angeles except for a few days a year. Easy enough to avoid entirely if we choose. -BA
 

grandpaul

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I always run the RoadRiders with tubes, ever since they were RoadRunners...
 

BAinLA

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What are you riding? I've read that only certain rims safely accept tubeless tires.

So far my research shows 100/90/19 for front (3.25x19) and 110/90/18 rear (4.00X18) Having a heck of a time finding both in Avon roadrunner. Looking at Dunlop TT100 too.

Do you use a special tube? Lots of some sort of powder? Used tubes once on a tubeless car once and had a blowout at sustained 80 MPH (2 hours up the central valley, Calif).
 

'72TR6RV

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What are you riding? I've read that only certain rims safely accept tubeless tires.

So far my research shows 100/90/19 for front (3.25x19) and 110/90/18 rear (4.00X18) Having a heck of a time finding both in Avon roadrunner. Looking at Dunlop TT100 too.

Do you use a special tube? Lots of some sort of powder? Used tubes once on a tubeless car once and had a blowout at sustained 80 MPH (2 hours up the central valley, Calif).
I have a 72' Tiger 5 speed. TR6RV now has 17k original miles. Was a barn / garage find a few years back. Lots of polishing but was inside and dry. Everything still original except all the rubber pieces. I went back with Dunlop K70 tires and new tubes. Got from Dennis Kirk.
A tubeless rim is probably available at a good cost including having it re-laced to the hub unless you like a challenge and lots of cold ones. It can be a royal PITA.
I'm currently building a 76' Bonneville. Bike was complete but in boxes. Good thing is that the engine and frame numbers match. The previous owner ran the left carbonator too lean and seized the left piston.
Chalk or talcum powder works good on the tubes.
 

BAinLA

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I have a 72' Tiger 5 speed. TR6RV now has 17k original miles. Was a barn / garage find a few years back. Lots of polishing but was inside and dry. Everything still original except all the rubber pieces. I went back with Dunlop K70 tires and new tubes. Got from Dennis Kirk.
A tubeless rim is probably available at a good cost including having it re-laced to the hub unless you like a challenge and lots of cold ones. It can be a royal PITA.
I'm currently building a 76' Bonneville. Bike was complete but in boxes. Good thing is that the engine and frame numbers match. The previous owner ran the left carbonator too lean and seized the left piston.
Chalk or talcum powder works good on the tubes.
Thanks! I'm looking at these K70s from Dennis Kirk. How sticky are they? I doubt that I will be making too many sparks from dragging foot pegs any more, but you never know. Do they handle freeway pavement ribs OK? Wet traction is not a factor here in L.A.
I'm not thinking about ANY upgrades (except an oil filter) until I get this bike really back to square one.
Wish I has a Bonnie project but this was too good of a price to pass up.
This 72 TR6RV has 20K showing on the odo but I don't know yet if it works! -BA

P.S. Valve stem diameter seems to be different on different tubes. .45" is listed on one Drag Specialties tube. What size do we use? Much thanks
 

'72TR6RV

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Thanks! I'm looking at these K70s from Dennis Kirk. How sticky are they? I doubt that I will be making too many sparks from dragging foot pegs any more, but you never know. Do they handle freeway pavement ribs OK? Wet traction is not a factor here in L.A.
I'm not thinking about ANY upgrades until I get this bike really back to square one.
Wish I has a Bonnie project but this was too good of a price to pass up.
This 72 TR6RV has 20K showing on the odo but I don't know yet if it works! -BA

P.S. Valve stem diameter seems to be different on different tubes. .45" is listed on one Drag Specialties tube. What size do we use? Much thanks
As far as sticky....and ribbed freeways....they handle good and dont seen to roll or slide out from under the bike.....but I'm not riding like I stole it either. Here in the Shenandoah Valley we have not many grooved highways.
 

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Having a heck of a time finding both in Avon roadrunner.
Probably because Avon haven't made Roadrunners for the best part of twenty years ... You should be looking for Roadriders ...

So far my research shows 100/90/19 for front (3.25x19) and 110/90/18 rear (4.00X18)
You are being misled.

"100", "3.25", "110", "4.00" are 'section widths', the "/90" after two of them indicates the 'section height' is 90% of the 'section width', that 3.25 and 4.00 don't have a 'slash number' indicates their section height is the same as their section width.

I couldn't tell you what a 'section width' is but I do know they are not overall widths and, in tyre sections alternative universe, something like a 4.10 TT100 is narrower overall than a 4.00 K70 ... o_O

Also, even though they might have the same numbers moulded on the sidewalls, 'new' tyre designs like Roadriders are wider overall than older tyre designs like the K70 and TT100; for example:-

. A 3.25 Roadrider is wider overall than the 3.25 K70 Triumph fitted to your bike originally, the 3.25 Roadrider is about the same overall width as a 4.10 TT100; a modern-design 100/90 is wider again. Conical-hub fork legs' centres are only 6-3/4" apart:-

.. a 3.25 K70 will fit between them;

.. a 4.10 TT100 or 3.25 Roadrider will probably fit between them (not tried it myself so I'd be inclined to pick a tyre supplier that won't mind changing it if it doesn't fit);

.. a modern-design (e.g. Roadrider) 100/90 might fit, but you might have to resort to fitting the wheel with the tyre deflated, inflating it when fitted; then, given the greater (in tyre terms) overall width compared to the original 3.25 K70, you might not be happy with the steering 'feel' on a light bike like yours ...

. At the rear:-

.. A 110/90 Roadrider is only a little wider overall than a 4.00 K70, and a 4.00 Roadrider is only a little wider again. Fwiw, ime the widest part of the tyre rubs on the chainguard and leaves an arc-shaped mark, I use that to cut a triangle shape out of the back of the chainguard with tin-snips, the tyre then clears the chain itself; however, check carefully as YMMV.

.. Be aware Avon has had some unspecified issue with specifically the new 110/90x18 Roadrider Mk.2, you might find it not available and, if you go for a modern design by another maker, for given section widths, Avon's overall widths are comparatively narrow compared to some other makers'. :(

Do you use a special tube?
Continental tubes seem to have the best rep., second are Michelin, either are better than no-name or Chinese cheapie.

When fitted and inflated, do not screw a nut down the valve to the rim. If the tyre 'creeps' on the rim, as it pulls the tube with it, you see the valve leaning in one direction or the other, before it rips out of the tyre, (y)

Not mentioned so far are rear tyre security bolts (= US "rim locks"?). Your bike's rear wheel was originally fitted with two; if still present, the tyre bead fits between them and the rim, when the nuts on their central studs are tightened, they clamp the tyre to the rim. Popular fiction has it they were to prevent 'tyre creep', Triumph engines never generated enough power unless the rear tyre pressure was allowed to fall very low. However, in the event of a rear wheel puncture, ime they are your new best friends ... it's still one of the best natural laxatives (surpassed only by a front wheel puncture ...) but the tyre won't come off the rim. (y)

If the security bolts are still present on your bike, fit them between the rim and the new rim tape; when fitting the new tyre (or subsequently removing it), only loosen the bolts' nuts to the ends of their studs, the bolts can be manoeuvred when fitting or removing a tyre bead but will otherwise stay in place.
 

grandpaul

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I like the universal pattern Dunlops now made in Indonesia or wherever...
 

BAinLA

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Probably because Avon haven't made Roadrunners for the best part of twenty years ... You should be looking for Roadriders ...


You are being misled.

"100", "3.25", "110", "4.00" are 'section widths', the "/90" after two of them indicates the 'section height' is 90% of the 'section width', that 3.25 and 4.00 don't have a 'slash number' indicates their section height is the same as their section width.

I couldn't tell you what a 'section width' is but I do know they are not overall widths and, in tyre sections alternative universe, something like a 4.10 TT100 is narrower overall than a 4.00 K70 ... o_O

Also, even though they might have the same numbers moulded on the sidewalls, 'new' tyre designs like Roadriders are wider overall than older tyre designs like the K70 and TT100; for example:-

. A 3.25 Roadrider is wider overall than the 3.25 K70 Triumph fitted to your bike originally, the 3.25 Roadrider is about the same overall width as a 4.10 TT100; a modern-design 100/90 is wider again. Conical-hub fork legs' centres are only 6-3/4" apart:-

.. a 3.25 K70 will fit between them;

.. a 4.10 TT100 or 3.25 Roadrider will probably fit between them (not tried it myself so I'd be inclined to pick a tyre supplier that won't mind changing it if it doesn't fit);

.. a modern-design (e.g. Roadrider) 100/90 might fit, but you might have to resort to fitting the wheel with the tyre deflated, inflating it when fitted; then, given the greater (in tyre terms) overall width compared to the original 3.25 K70, you might not be happy with the steering 'feel' on a light bike like yours ...

. At the rear:-

.. A 110/90 Roadrider is only a little wider overall than a 4.00 K70, and a 4.00 Roadrider is only a little wider again. Fwiw, ime the widest part of the tyre rubs on the chainguard and leaves an arc-shaped mark, I use that to cut a triangle shape out of the back of the chainguard with tin-snips, the tyre then clears the chain itself; however, check carefully as YMMV.

.. Be aware Avon has had some unspecified issue with specifically the new 110/90x18 Roadrider Mk.2, you might find it not available and, if you go for a modern design by another maker, for given section widths, Avon's overall widths are comparatively narrow compared to some other makers'. :(


Continental tubes seem to have the best rep., second are Michelin, either are better than no-name or Chinese cheapie.

When fitted and inflated, do not screw a nut down the valve to the rim. If the tyre 'creeps' on the rim, as it pulls the tube with it, you see the valve leaning in one direction or the other, before it rips out of the tyre, (y)

Not mentioned so far are rear tyre security bolts (= US "rim locks"?). Your bike's rear wheel was originally fitted with two; if still present, the tyre bead fits between them and the rim, when the nuts on their central studs are tightened, they clamp the tyre to the rim. Popular fiction has it they were to prevent 'tyre creep', Triumph engines never generated enough power unless the rear tyre pressure was allowed to fall very low. However, in the event of a rear wheel puncture, ime they are your new best friends ... it's still one of the best natural laxatives (surpassed only by a front wheel puncture ...) but the tyre won't come off the rim. (y)

If the security bolts are still present on your bike, fit them between the rim and the new rim tape; when fitting the new tyre (or subsequently removing it), only loosen the bolts' nuts to the ends of their studs, the bolts can be manoeuvred when fitting or removing a tyre bead but will otherwise stay in place.
Thanks Rudie, this helps a lot.

Yes I have the "rim-locks". It's all coming back to me about tubes and tires.

That is a pretty confusing situation with the tubeless sizes. I guess I will go with the K70s. I remember Waaaaaay back in the '70s that these were made from a harder rubber compound and were not good at all for "spirited" riding. The Avons were the ticket back then and I still recall this clearly. I'm sure the Dunlop K-70s are adequate for what I plan though but just barely unless they have been improved in the last 48 years.
 

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pretty confusing situation with the tubeless sizes.
How so? Are you being confused because "TUBELESS" is moulded on sidewalls of even Roadriders? I can't speak for every Roadrider size but certainly the ones that fit old British bikes - 3.25, 4.00, 90/90, 100/90, 110/90, 120/90 - can be used with tubes. Roadriders have been around since the mid-noughties, AM20/21 Roadrunners for twenty? years before that; thousands and thousands (millions?) of old British bike riders all over the world have used them with tubes without problems.

If you're unsure, simply email Avon in the UK?
 

BAinLA

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How so? Are you being confused because "TUBELESS" is moulded on sidewalls of even Roadriders? I can't speak for every Roadrider size but certainly the ones that fit old British bikes - 3.25, 4.00, 90/90, 100/90, 110/90, 120/90 - can be used with tubes. Roadriders have been around since the mid-noughties, AM20/21 Roadrunners for twenty? years before that; thousands and thousands (millions?) of old British bike riders all over the world have used them with tubes without problems.

If you're unsure, simply email Avon in the UK?
Cutting the chain guard or having issues mounting or different handling due to being fatter, all of these things are beyond my interests at this early stage with this machine. I went ahead and ordered the K70s with tubes and liners. I'll probably need to wire-wheel a bunch of rust and also see if the brake drums are serviceable. My intention is to just get this bike back on the road as cheaply as possible. Thanks Rudie for all of your help and this info will be carefully considered if I keep this bike long enough to require a second set of better handling tires. Thanks again -BA
 

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BAinLA Just now reading about your "new" bike,,, you scored good!
 

BAinLA

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Thanks triumph david,

I feel lucky because one might expect a bike like this, forgotten for 28+ years, to be a victim of "deferred maintenance" and expect to find nearly everything worn out, broken or missing. But in this case it is quite the contrary. The owner was a mechanical engineer by profession and apparently kept it in very good condition. I found the compression perfect, makes no smoke (I see where he purchased piston rings), shifts through all 5 gears up and down perfectly (I see where he was planning a transmission rebuild project and apparently he completed it) chains are good and adjusted properly, valves were set, electrical is all good except for a couple bulbs and everything is there. I still need to do a few things before I can put it into regular service but this will happen very soon! Cheers! -BA
 

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BAinLA

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Got 'er registered for the open road;
before:


after:


Tires purchased in 1985 by original owner;



Look at this! Bit of a flat spot from ~30 years sitting;

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ASS-rEh2sNs


New tires come in tomorrow!!! -BA
 
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BAinLA

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Got the new tires today and went to install the front and found the fork caps (that hold the wheel on) both in 2 pieces! I saw the crack on each when I first got this bike and I was hoping it was just a scratch or something. Not.


At least I got the tire on there with new tube and rim strip of course. Cleaned up the brake drum and shoes which both look totally serviceable.

Now off to see if anybody makes these caps or if I am looking for used ones. -BA
 

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You can get new replacements or have a local welder weld them up.
 

BAinLA

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I see them on Ebay for $45 a set shipped. Might have to go that route. I will torque them carefully, once I find the spec. -BA
 
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